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Antietam

NEWS
September 15, 1997
By JULIE E. GREENE Staff Writer The 135th Commemoration of the Battle of Antietam was so successful organizers already are talking about holding the event every five years. Event co-chairwoman Susan Saum-Wicklein said Monday she and co-chairman Dennis Frye talked casually this past weekend about making the commemoration a regular event. Saum-Wicklein said she thought Frye's estimate of 100,000 spectators was a little high, although official counts were not yet available.
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NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | June 10, 2005
HAGERSTOWN gregs@herald-mail.com The Battle of Antietam was 142 years ago, but a new book offers a fresh look at where the battle happened. Halli Casser-Jayne, of Shepherdstown, W.Va., said she hopes her book, "Still Life Images of Antietam," will bridge the gap between history and art. "The book is very 'now,'" Casser-Jayne said Thursday as she sat behind neat stacks of the book at the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau's visitors center on North Potomac Street, signing copies for the book's premiere.
NEWS
September 12, 1997
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY Staff Writer Alice Hunger and Kay Byers already had a good portion of their large tent set up with Civil War uniforms, accessories and military gear by the time a thunderstorm hit the Artz farm Wednesday night. The Winchester, Va.-based sutlers said it never occurred to them to leave the tent and find another place to sleep. "You don't walk off and leave $30,000 worth of merchandise. You live, eat and breathe with it," said Hunger, who figured they got away lucky with just a few drops sneaking in to the canvas tent.
NEWS
by JOHN LEAGUE | September 23, 2002
Hagerstown and Washington County got a chance to show off last weekend during the 140th anniversary re-enactment of the Battle of Antietam. And by all accounts, our community did just that. It was something to see. Not only the battle re-enactments, but just the sheer number of tents, soldiers and weaponry. If you watched any of it, you came away with a sense of the scale of the battle, the horror of war and the price our country paid for it. I was there each day and met people from Texas, Indiana, Illinois and South Dakota, as well as elsewhere in Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.
NEWS
By DON AINES | May 26, 2008
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. -- Abraham Lincoln said at Gettysburg that "the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here," words echoed Monday by Letterkenny Army Depot Commander Col. Steven Shapiro. Lincoln was, in one respect, wrong. The Gettysburg Address is much noted and long remembered, as is the sacrifice of those who have given their lives in this nation's wars. Memorial Square was ringed by veterans from five wars, bands and a few hundred onlookers Monday for the 140th Memorial Day, some old soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines stiffening to attention for "The Star-Spangled Banner.
NEWS
September 21, 1997
By STEVEN T. DENNIS Staff Writer A new novel by author Kathleen Ernst looks at the Battle of Antietam from a new perspective - how it affected the friendship of two young women who lived in Sharpsburg and took different sides in the war. The "Bravest Girl in Sharpsburg" is based on real women who lived in the town during the battle, Teresa Kretzer and Savilla Miller. Kretzer and Miller lived a few houses away from each other and were both near 20 years old but had very different thoughts on the Civil War, Ernst said.
NEWS
August 31, 1997
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY Staff Writer Organizers appreciated Allegheny Power System's offer to string temporary power lines to the Artz farm property during next month's commemoration of the 135th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam. But it just wasn't an option in providing needed power to the Sutlers' Village booths, said event coordinator Greg Larsen. "It would have been less expensive, but we had to say 'no' to try to maintain integrity," said Larsen, who instead searched for a silent generator to do the job. The three-day event commemorating the Sept.
NEWS
September 28, 2008
Several years ago, the descendants of the men who were members of the Irish Brigade from New York and Massachusetts and fought at Antietam during the Civil War asked area Boy Scouts to place flags on the graves at the National Cemetery. Boy Scout Troop 14 has taken on this project. On Sept. 13, members of Troop 14 placed U.S. flags on the graves of 30 Irish Brigade soldiers at the National Cemetery. The Scouts visited other grave sites in the cemetery and learned of the history of the battle and the significance of remembering fallen soldiers.
NEWS
by LAURA ERNDE | December 9, 2002
laurae@herald-mail.com When "Gods and Generals" arrives in theaters in February, it may not have scenes from Washington County's most famous Civil War event, the Battle of Antietam. A lot of footage was lost when director Ronald Maxwell pared down his original six-hour version of the movie to about 31/2 hours for theater audiences. Antietam scenes were cut and later restored, said movie publicist Vic Heutschy. The fate of the Antietam footage won't be known until Maxwell finishes the movie's final cut, probably in January, said Dennis Frye, a local historian who worked as an associate producer of the movie.
NEWS
June 1, 1997
By ELLEN LYON Staff Writer SHARPSBURG - For average soldiers, the horror of battle hasn't changed much in 135 years. And neither have some of the command and communications problems plaguing their leaders. At least that was the conclusion of about a dozen U.S. Army Signal Corps officers from the Pentagon who toured Antietam National Battlefield Saturday with a Penn State history professor. The group of officers, which included majors, lieutenant colonels and two full colonels, were especially interested in learning about the strategies and leadership styles used during the battle.
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