Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsAntietam National Battlefield
IN THE NEWS

Antietam National Battlefield

OPINION
September 22, 2012
Thumbs up to the organizers and participants in the recent Battle of Antietam Re-enactment in Fairplay and the 150th anniversary activities at Antietam National Battlefield. Many months of planning culminated in several days of battles, demonstrations, exhibits and speeches that gave us a glimpse of an important time in our nation's history. Thumbs up to the Baltimore Orioles and Washington Nationals, who have made professional baseball in late September matter to local fans for the first time in years.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 21, 2012
Dunker Church, Antietam National Battlefield, Sharpsburg, International Day of Prayer for Peace worship service will be at 5 p.m. Sunday.
LIFESTYLE
September 21, 2012
Age: Jim is 71, Sue  is 64 City in which you reside: Johnstown, Pa. Day job: Jim is safety manager at Carnegie Mellon University, Sue is a travel consultant at AAA Book title: "So You Think You Know Antietam? The Stories Behind America's Bloodiest Day. " Genre: A reviewer of our Gettysburg book, after which the Antietam book was patterned, said that the book "wears many hats. " Some have called it a photography book, others a book of battle trivia and some a travel guide.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | September 17, 2012
On a small stage near a country church that witnessed some of the bloodiest fighting in American history, a U.S. Army general told several hundred people the story of a 15-year-old private who received the nation's highest military honor during the Battle of Antietam. Maj. Gen. Mark S. Bowman said Pvt. John Cook, a bugler serving in Battery B of the 4th U.S. Artillery Regiment, received the Medal of Honor for joining the fight after other soldiers fell on Sept. 17, 1862. “This soldier, just 15 years old, risked his life to save fellow soldiers,” Bowman said in a speech marking the 150th anniversary of the battle Monday at Antietam National Battlefield.
NEWS
September 17, 2012
Approximately 650 Boy Scouts attended the 150th commemoration events for the Battle of Antietam at Antietam National Battlefield during the past few days, said Tade Sullivan, the Mason-Dixon Council of Boy Scouts of America's district executive for Washington County. The boys helped direct parking, passed out water, helped with flag ceremonies, handed out programs and patrolled trails to assist anyone in need, Sullivan said. The National Park Service gave each scout a resource ranger stewardship award, which is a badge, Sullivan said.
NEWS
September 17, 2012
One-hundred-and-fifty years ago Monday, this county was the scene of the bloodiest single day of the Civil War or the War of Northern Aggression. If you are a frequent reader of this column, then you know I am almost as passionate about history as I am about agriculture. As we look back, “The 1860 agricultural census of Washington County portrays pre-war Sharpsburg as a district of prime land, crops, and animal husbandry (the raising of livestock). Typically, wheat, Indian corn, hay, rye oats and Irish potatoes were the crops raised.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | September 16, 2012
After Pulitzer Prize-winning author James M. McPherson spoke to a large crowd about the Battle of Antietam for about 45 minutes Sunday night, Ed Bearss approached the podium and jokingly thanked his longtime friend for his “preliminary remarks” about Antietam. Bearss' comment elicited loud laughter from the audience of approximately 500 who came to the tent outside Antietam National Battlefield's visitors center Sunday night to hear two of the most renowned Civil War historians.
NEWS
By CALEB CALHOUN | caleb.calhoun@herald-mail.com | September 16, 2012
Dead Civil War soldiers showing up at re-enactments and a camera that predicts people's deaths were among the stories told at the site of the 150th anniversary re-enactment of the Battle of Antietam. Johlene “Spooky” Riley, author, ghost hunter, radio show host, and lead investigator and founder of the Gettysburg (Pa.) Paranormal Association, told stories Sunday of ghostly encounters near Antietam National Battlefield and Gettysburg to a crowd of attendees and re-enactors in the activities tent.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | September 14, 2012
There are no bulldozers turning the earth on old and historic fields, no acreage falling victim to the relentless march of development. Instead, Antietam National Battlefield is a dignified memorial to all who fought there - peaceful and picturesque. Shallow water murmurs below Burnside Bridge and overhanging trees shade narrow winding lanes that edge acres of cornfields. If you listen closely, you might think you hear heroic ghosts whisper of a great and terrible battle that was fought here 150 years ago - the site of the bloodiest day in the nation's wartime history.
NEWS
September 14, 2012
People came from far and wide Friday to the site of this weekend's Sesquicentennial Antietam Reenactment at Legacy Manor Farm off Bakersville Road. The Herald-Mail caught up with a few of them: Ralph C. Lincoln Berlin, Pa. Abraham's Lincoln third cousin showed up at the Sesquicentennial Antietam Reenactment site Friday. Ralph C. Lincoln said he has an ancestor related to one of Lincoln's great-grandfathers. Despite the connection and his admiration for the 16th president of the United States, whom he portrays, Lincoln said he was never awestruck by the relationship.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|