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Antietam Creek

NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | September 5, 2012
Editor's note:   It has been 150 years since the Civil War moved into Washington County and North and South met Sept. 17, 1862, on a battlefield along Antietam Creek. The following story is part of a package of stories that look back at the Battle of Antietam and the Civil War's impact on Washington County, Md., and the surrounding area.   Shortly before 6 a.m. Sept. 17, 1862, Union soldiers launched an assault across a cornfield against Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's left flank a little more than a mile north of Sharpsburg.
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NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | September 5, 2012
Editor's note:   It has been 150 years since the Civil War moved into Washington County and North and South met Sept. 17, 1862, on a battlefield along Antietam Creek. The following story is part of a package of stories that look back at the Battle of Antietam and the Civil War's impact on Washington County, Md., and the surrounding area.   By the time Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's army reached the Potomac River north of Leesburg, Va., on Sept. 4, 1862, approximately one-third of his troops were barefoot, their shoes worn out from months of marching and fighting.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | August 23, 2012
About 40 people attended a hearing Thursday afternoon about a farmer's proposal to draw up to a little more than 1 million gallons of water per day from Antietam Creek, and the discussion at times focused on overall concerns about management of the stream besides the farmer's request. The Maryland Department of Environment's Water Management Administration is considering allowing dairy farmer Dean Lehman to draw an annual average of 123,000 gallons of water per day from the creek and a maximum daily withdrawal of 1,152,000 gallons from the stream.
OPINION
August 14, 2012
City leaders indicate that it has proved to be more difficult than expected to drive a stake through the heart of the old municipal light plant, an industrial dreadnought that generated Hagerstown's electricity for much of the 20th century, but now sits sullenly along the banks of Antietam Creek. The council hopes to get a share of the $5 million from metal in and around the massive old hulk, but the price of scrap has been dropping of late, making demolition companies reluctant to take on the task.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | August 5, 2012
The last Civil War soldier to witness the fighting at Burnside Bridge during the Battle of Antietam died nearly a century ago. But a 170-year-old eastern sycamore tree that abuts the north end of the stone bridge continues to thrive. Joe Calzarette, natural resources manager at Antietam National Battlefield, said the tree undoubtedly was hit by gunfire as thousands of Union and Confederate soldiers fought for control of the bridge on Sept. 17, 1862. “Boy, if it could talk,” Calzarette said of the tree, known as a witness tree because it was there at the time of the battle.
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | July 21, 2012
Richard E. “Rich” Fouke II said his parents had three chapters to their life together - their 19 years of marriage before he was born, their life raising their only child and their years as empty nesters filled with travel.  Now, they have one more chapter. “It's hard to lose a parent, but when you know beyond a shadow of a doubt how much he loved her, it's easier to let him go back to her to live out the next chapter,” said son Rich, who lives in Brunswick, Md. “When she died, it was sheer desperation.
OPINION
By DAVID HANLIN | June 27, 2012
The three Allen men spent the early months guarding the nation's capital. When the rebels threatened Washington, D.C., in May 1862, the Rangers were mobilized and ordered into Virginia to engage the enemy at what has become known as Second Manassas. After the battle, the regiment was withdrawn to Alexandria, Va., for several weeks of rest and recovery. The Rangers were then assigned to Fort Corcoran to defend the main railroad bridge into the city. According to Maj. Samuel H. Leavitt, a contemporary of Abram's, in September 1862, on short notice, the unit was mobilized and forced to march over South Mountain through Pleasant Valley toward Harpers Ferry.
NEWS
May 6, 2012
Antietam Historical Association will sponsor its second annual Spring Garden Fest from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 19, at Antietam Farm, 8076 Lyons Road. Spring Garden Fest includes nature walks, musical performances, homemade refreshments and horse-drawn carriage rides. According to a news release, the proprietor of Maryland, Lord Baltimore, granted a patent deed for the present Antietam Farm to Jacob Gans in 1753. Ten years later, however, the survey of the Mason-Dixon line placed most of the farm in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
Antietam Creek Watershed Alliance invites volunteers of all ages to help pick up paper, bottles and cans along Hamilton Run, the stream behind the former McDonald's on Northern Avenue, Hagerstown. Cleanup will be from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, April 22. Meet at Gold's Gym parking lot, 562 Northern Ave., Hagers-town. Gloves, trash bags and trash grabbers will be provided. Wear appropriate clothing. Call 301-745-3169 or email sboss49@att.net .
LIFESTYLE
September 30, 2011
More than 50 volunteers pulled mounds of trash from the Antietam Creek during the Antietam Creek Watershed Alliance's sixth annual Rubbish Roundup on Saturday, Sept. 17. Despite high water, cool weather and occasional sprinkles, volunteers filled a dump truck with trash. They also piled metal objects in a pickup truck and collected multiple bags of plastic bottles, aluminum cans and other recyclables. Noteworthy items pulled from the creek included an automotive crankshaft and drive shaft, a mini-bike and a shopping cart basket.
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