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Amyloidosis

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by KRISTIN WILSON | October 3, 2005
kristinw@herald-mail.com Martha Wiles' liver is totally normal except for one, critical, genetic mutation. Her liver produces a mutant form of the protein transthyretin, or TTR. As this abnormal protein travels throughout her body, it is deposited along her nervous system, creating a thin film that shuts off nerve function. Wiles, of Boonsboro, has a condition called amyloidosis, a disorder affecting thousands of Americans. But she is one of the lucky ones. In 2002, she received a liver transplant that effectively stopped the continued buildup of abnormal proteins.
NEWS
March 16, 2006
Amyloidosis support offered The amyloidosis support group will meet at noon today at Richardson's Restaurant, 710 Dual Highway, U.S. 40, Hagerstown. The group meets for lunch to offer empathy, support and fellowship for people dealing with amyloidosis. For information, call Elinor at 301-797-7415. Spaghetti supper CLEAR SPRING - Clear Spring High School Band Boosters will hold a spaghetti supper from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, March 17, at the commons area of Clear Spring High School.
NEWS
April 17, 2006
Al-Anon/Alateen family groups Hagerstown and Frederick, Md., area. This is an anonymous, confidential support group for anyone affected by a family member's or friend's drinking. There are no fees. Call 1-301-663-6626 for a listing of meetings in the area. Frederickmommies.com FREDERICK, Md. - The Web site offers local moms a way to find advice, friendship and listening ears. The site has public information areas as well as secure, members-only forums, divided into user groups based on location.
NEWS
January 13, 2003
Increase awareness of amyloidosis To the editor: I would like to see an interview done on "amyloidosis. " I realize this disease is hard for doctors to recognize but there are those who have treated amyloidosis in this area. This is a disease in which a protein forms insoluble fibril deposits, causing organ dysfunctions. Twenty different fibril proteins have been described in human amyloidosis. There are several types of "Amy," but the one that is prevalent in this area is "familial.
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NEWS
October 15, 2007
Al-Anon/Alateen Family Groups Hagerstown and Frederick, Md., areas. This is an anonymous, confidential support group for anyone affected by the drinking of a family member or friend. Call 301-663-6626. Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) Md. 77 Today, weigh in at 7:30 a.m., exercise at 8:30, meeting at 9:30, First Christian Church, 1345 Potomac Ave., Hagerstown. Call Donna, 301-223-8143. TOPS Md. 454 WILLIAMSPORT - Tuesday, Oct. 16, private weigh-in at 10:15 to 11 a.m., meeting at 11 a.m. to noon, Zion Lutheran Church, 35 W. Potomac St. Visitors are welcome.
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NEWS
March 16, 2006
Amyloidosis support offered The amyloidosis support group will meet at noon today at Richardson's Restaurant, 710 Dual Highway, U.S. 40, Hagerstown. The group meets for lunch to offer empathy, support and fellowship for people dealing with amyloidosis. For information, call Elinor at 301-797-7415. Spaghetti supper CLEAR SPRING - Clear Spring High School Band Boosters will hold a spaghetti supper from 5 to 7 p.m. Friday, March 17, at the commons area of Clear Spring High School.
NEWS
October 16, 2005
Farmers aren't responsible for bay's problems To the editor: This is concerning the recent letter sent to Maryland residents about the Chesapeake Bay Restoration Fund. I, along with many other Maryland residents feel this is just another way to scam money from the average homeowner. I do not understand why they (the state of Maryland) are blaming the farmers for polluting the waterways. Most farmers only apply a maximum of 200 pounds of fertilizer to an entire acre, while most homeowners apply several hundred pounds to a few square feet, causing more runoff than a farmer.
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