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NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | September 30, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - Tourists will be able to learn about the rich Civil War and civil rights history associated with Murphy's Farm through a 1.8-mile hiking trail being proposed for the 99-acre farm, officials said Monday. The trail will start at the Harpers Ferry National Historical Park visitors center at Cavalier Heights and extend through forested areas to reach Murphy's Farm, park officials said. At Murphy's Farm, the trail will use an existing farm lane that winds through an open field.
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LIFESTYLE
By MARIE GILBERT | marieg@herald-mail.com | January 19, 2013
In the mid-20th century, a black seamstress, tired after a long day at work, was thrown into jail and fined because she refused to give up her seat on an Alabama bus so a white man could sit down. A 6-year-old black child was spit upon by a New Orleans mob because she wanted to go to the same school as white children. Blacks could not eat at lunch counters or use whites-only restrooms. There were separate drinking fountains for blacks and whites and black balconies in movie theaters, which also had separate stairways.
NEWS
January 31, 2001
The next generation of city leaders Back in September, when the only non-incumbents expressing interest in running for city office were former councilmen Larry Vaughn and Ira Kauffman and ex-mayor Steve Sager, I wrote a column asking where Hagerstown's next generation of city leaders was. No offense to these City Hall veterans, I said, but wasn't there someone out there, I asked, with the energy of a Chris Shank, who won the 1998 race...
NEWS
by MARLO BARNHART | July 26, 2004
marlob@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Who better to help empower people to improve their opportunities in housing, in the work force as well as in life than a woman who already has embarked on the same journey? Kelly Collins just signed on as the first paid VISTA volunteer coordinator with Washington County's Habitat for Humanity, and the native Floridian is eager to share her experiences and ideas. "I saw an advertisement on the Hagerstown Community College Web site while I was working at the call center there," Collins said.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | January 31, 2005
gregs@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Kristin B. Aleshire said the groundwork laid by he and his fellow elected officials in city government has put Hagerstown in a better position than four years ago, and he wants to continue that direction. Aleshire, a Democrat, is a candidate for the Hagerstown City Council. Aleshire, 29, of 1217 Virginia Ave., has been on the council for nearly four years. He also is planning and zoning administrator for the towns of Middletown, Md., and Myersville, Md., in Frederick County.
NEWS
April 5, 2004
We are right to fight back To the editor: Charley Reese praises President Clinton because fewer Americans died from terrorism during his administration than under President Bush. But he is wrong to say that this is because Clinton was doing the right thing. The terrorists have said openly that they went ahead with 9/11 because America's response to the terrorist acts in the 1990s was so weak. Now we've learned from a captured al-Qaeda leader that they were planning to attack Chicago and Los Angeles after 9/11, but decided not to because of our strong response to 9/11.
NEWS
By BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | October 30, 2005
bonnieb@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - Pennsylvania is the birthplace of special education in the United States, thanks to a lawsuit filed by parents of a special-needs child many years ago, according to Kay Lipsitz of the Pennsylvania Education Network. "Their child was at home, receiving no education," Lipsitz said. The education that child needs might be different from that the siblings receive, but the child must be educated, she said. Local experts on special education gathered Saturday for a conference, "Children: Our Investment in the Future," to help parents better understand the educational processes necessary for their children.
NEWS
by CAILIN MCGOUGH | July 8, 2002
cailinm@herald-mail.com When school lets out, summer school is in for a number of area students who go to catch up on course requirements or gain credit to get ahead. In Washington County, some students attend as a requirement for promotion to the next grade level, but others come to get extra help with reading, writing and math, Executive Director of Secondary Education Boyd Michael III said. Michael said 269 students are enrolled in high school summer school classes and 625 students are enrolled in middle school classes, which are held for 19 days.
NEWS
August 19, 2006
Thumbs up to B. Marie Byers , for her fine performance as moderator of two Washington County candidate forums this past week. For two hours each night, she kept the proceedings running smoothly and professionally, enforcing the rules in a way that gave all candidates an equal chance to be heard. Byers also spent months helping to plan the events. Thumbs up to the late W.E.B. DuBois and the late J.R. Clifford , among others, who in 1905 founded the Niagara Movement, which held its first meeting in 1906 at the campus of Storer College, now a part of the Harpers Ferry National Historical Park in West Virginia.
NEWS
by MARIE GILBERT/Staff Writer | April 19, 2005
A young volunteer came from the community room, cradling a box of cleaning supplies in her arms. "I think we're on the ninth floor," Brittany Stranathan said to her friends waiting for her near the elevators. The 16-year-old Boonsboro High School student waited patiently in a hallway crowded with teenagers who were armed with paper towels and bottles of glass cleaner. Only a few people at a time could fit on the elevator, so it would be a while until everyone could get their chores started.
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