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Alternative School

NEWS
March 26, 2001
Staff, students at alternative school face challenges By TARA REILLY tarar@herald-mail.com Mark Keefer shouts over the rumblings of a tin roof as wind whips against the half of a trailer that serves as his classroom. continued He tells his science class to ignore the noise and then continues with his lesson about battery cells. The trailer, which is wide enough for three rows of students, is part of the Washington County Public Schools' Alternative Learning Center on the South Hagerstown High School campus.
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NEWS
January 3, 2001
Consolidation of schools proposed By TARA REILLY / Staff Writer Maugansville and Conococheague elementary schools would be closed and consolidated into a new $11 million school under a proposal in the Washington County Board of Education's Capital Improvement Plan for fiscal years 2003-2007. continued In addition, a 33,186-square-foot section of Bester Elementary School built in 1965 would be demolished and replaced with a new $10 million school at the same site.
NEWS
August 23, 2000
Mail Call for 8/23 "I feel the need to clarify something. The Job Development Center is a Washington County pubic school for students with special needs meaning handicap's or learning disabilities. It is not an alternative school for behavioral problems or juvenile delinquents. Despite all efforts, there still seems to be some confusion as to what JDC is. " "I would like to know why Roadway trucks have to go so fast on Oak Ridge Drive? They have double trailers on there and they fly down there.
NEWS
By DON AINES | February 14, 2000
HARRISBURG, Pa. - A bill that would make parents of expelled students pay for alternative education programs passed overwhelmingly Monday in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. cont. from news page House Bill 1576 passed by a vote of 186 to 9, said its sponsor, state Rep. Allan Egolf, R-Franklin. He said the bill's next stop likely will be the Senate Education Committee. "I'm hoping I can get a couple of senators from our area to support it," Egolf said. "The responsibility is on the parents to find the alternative education, but that has to be approved by the school board," Egolf said.
NEWS
By DON AINES | November 30, 1999
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. ? Duffield Elementary School will close at the end of the school year, but rather than sell the property, the Chambersburg Area School District intends to lease it for use as an alternative school for its students. At its Feb. 28 meeting, the school board authorized the administration to seek a lease agreement with Manito Inc. for use of the 77-year-old school building. The district needs more space for a growing population of students needing alternative education programs, Assistant Superintendent Eric Michael said.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | August 12, 1999
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - An alternative school that deals with students at risk of becoming dropouts will be merged with a state-operated program that helps juvenile delinquents, according to a Jefferson County Schools spokeswoman. On Tuesday, the Jefferson County Board of Education decided to move the Alternative Education Center in with the state-operated Students Out of School (SOS) program, which works with teenage delinquents, youths on probation and students suspended from school, said spokeswoman Liz Thompson.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | July 14, 1999
Two Washington County teenagers charged in separate bomb threats at their schools in the spring appeared in Washington County Juvenile Court Wednesday. In one case, a 14-year-old boy who in April wrote an e-mail bomb threat that was intercepted by South Hagerstown High School officials admitted to one count of harassment. Despite an effort by attorney Ed Kuczynski to have disposition Wednesday, Judge Frederick Wright insisted that there be a delay. "Why shouldn't the Department of Juvenile Justice get all the information about this young man?"
NEWS
By BRUCE HAMILTON | May 2, 1999
Hundreds of extra eyes and ears will be in Washington County Schools today as parents, police and school staff provide more security in an atmosphere of heightened tension. [cont. from front page ] The Washington County Board of Education is sending most of its Central Office employees out to schools, including pupil personnel workers and psychologists, according to Director of Secondary Education Boyd Michael III. More than 50 retired and current employees are expected to join parent volunteers to watch, listen and reassure students troubled by vague rumors of violence.
NEWS
By DAN KULIN /Staff Writer | April 30, 1999
Two Washington County students were charged with making violent threats and one was charged with bringing a knife to school on Friday, as tensions throughout the school system remained high in the wake of recent slayings at a Colorado high school. Meanwhile, school administrators and parents planned additional calming measures including broadcasting a video about school safety and arranging for parents, Board of Education officials and retired school system employees to patrol county schools on Monday.
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