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NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | January 24, 2011
With one major regulatory hurdle standing between the merger of FirstEnergy and local energy supplier Allegheny Energy, just what is FirstEnergy? The Akron, Ohio-based company that could buy out Allegheny by the end of March has more diverse power-generating sources and more than three times as many employees as Allegheny. It serves 4.5 million customers in Ohio, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York, according to company information found at www.firstenergycorp.com , and in U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission filings.
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NEWS
January 22, 2011
In approving the Allegheny Energy/FirstEnergy merger, the Maryland Public Service Commission called on the utilities to "meet certain conditions that track (and, in certain instances, build upon) commitments the applicants offered to make in the course of this case. " "These conditions will ensure that Potomac Edison's ratepayers share in the synergies and savings expected to result from the transaction, that Potomac Edison is protected appropriately against the potential new risks of being part of this new, bigger company, and that our state share in the economic development and renewable energy opportunities the applicants have promised," the PSC said in its order dated Jan. 18. The PSC, in the document, said "because our conditions differ in some respects from those contained in the Joint Petition for Approval of Settlement," the applicants must decide whether to proceed on these terms.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | January 22, 2011
The impending merger of Allegheny Energy and FirstEnergy could lead to more charitable donations for the local community as well as modest rate credits or reductions for Allegheny's customers and more backup for repairs after major outages, officials with the two utility companies said. On Tuesday, the Maryland Public Service Commission approved the merger with 20 conditions, most of which were consistent with a previous settlement agreement. That started the clock on the 30-day period the merging companies have to respond to the commission's order and left one more regulatory hurdle to clear — approval by the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission.
BREAKINGNEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | January 19, 2011
The Maryland Public Service Commission has approved the proposed merger of FirstEnergy and Allegheny Energy, leaving the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission as the sole regulatory hurdle to the merger. Maryland's PSC approved the merger Tuesday with 20 conditions, according to an online filing. FirstEnergy spokeswoman Ellen Raines said the merging utilities have 30 days to respond to the commission's order. The commission's conditions were largely consistent with the settlement agreement filed by the companies and several parties to the case, she said.
NEWS
September 9, 2010
GREENSBURG, Pa. -- Allegheny Energy Inc. announced Thursday that its R. Paul Smith Power Station in Williamsport was recognized for operational excellence by Navigant Consulting. The 116-megawatt facility received the 2010 runner-up award in the small coal plant category for demonstrated excellence in operation and maintenance spending and unit availability from 2005-09. "The award is a tribute to the dedicated work of our employees at R. Paul Smith. Their success is another great example of our high performance culture," said Paul J. Evanson, chairman, president and CEO of Allegheny Energy.
NEWS
November 10, 2009
The ABC Professional Tree Services is trimming trees along Allegheny Energy power lines.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | November 8, 2009
SHARPSBURG -- More than 900 homes in southern Washington County were without power for almost 12 hours on Saturday after a car hit a utility pole on Porterstown Road, according to police and an Allegheny Energy spokesman. The car hit a pole near Geeting Road northeast of Sharpsburg around 1:30 a.m. Saturday, according to the Washington County Sheriff's Office. The pole had a heavy regulator attached to it, causing the pole to come down "like a missile," yanking three other utility poles down with it, Allegheny Energy spokesman Doug Colafella said.
NEWS
November 2, 2009
o If you like reading Tim Rowland, you'll love watching him. See what else Tim has to say The linemen from Allegheny Energy were true professionals. The dogs were not. Some background: We felt rather superior when we received the notice that you can sign up for an escaped-prisoner alert from the Division of Correction. Little old ladies might need that, I thought, but not moi. First, I have a shotgun, although I cannot necessarily endorse its effectiveness.
NEWS
November 2, 2009
WILLIAMSPORT -- The National Canal Museum's traveling exhibit "Building America's Canals" recently left Williamsport after a successful second season. The exhibit was in the restored trolley barn at the Cushwa Basin in the C&O Canal National Historical Park. The hands-on exhibit was on-site from April to October 2008, and based upon its popularity, was brought back for the same period this year. Through an arrangement with Washington County Public Schools, county fourth-graders visited the exhibit as part of their local history lessons.
NEWS
October 29, 2009
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) -- A West Virginia Public Service Commission lawyer moved Wednesday to dismiss an application on a proposed multistate power line saying the project is incomplete and data supporting the venture is outdated. John Auville noted the proposed 765-kilovolt Potomac-Appalachian Transmission Highline, or PATH, would have a starting point, but no end point since Maryland officials dismissed an application to build the line through 20 miles of that state. Allegheny Energy and partner American Electric Power have proposed building the $1.9 billion, 275-mile line from AEP's coal-fired John Amos plant in Putnam County, across parts of northern Virginia, to a substation near Kemptown, Md. Maryland's Public Service Commission dismissed the application saying the companies created to develop the line were not an electric utility under Maryland law. The ruling gave Allegheny Energy subsidiary Potomac Edison until Oct. 9 to refile the application.
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