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NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | May 18, 2004
scottb@herald-mail.com Star-Lena Quintana of Northern Middle School does not think it's a big deal that she is taking - as a seventh-grader - an algebra course that most Washington County Public Schools students don't take until high school. "I think it's cool because it's fun. Most people think it's, like, hard and everything. But with this teacher, it's fun," Star-Lena, 12, said during a break in the class last week. "It is not too hard. " Star-Lena is taking part in a pilot project for advanced students at three schools - Northern, Smithsburg and Boonsboro middle schools - who are taking algebra.
NEWS
April 24, 2009
Guard member dies during MP training Missing VA Center resident found in Baltimore Man in critical condition after house fire SUV crashes into animal hospital Pre-algebra instructor is teacher of the year
NEWS
By CLYDE FORD | April 10, 1998
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - The Class of 2003 at Jefferson High School will face tougher graduation requirements. The Jefferson County Board of Education increased the graduation requirements on Wednesday to meet new state mandates. That means students will have to complete more advanced math and science courses and also take at least one course in fine arts or performing arts. Students now in the seventh grade will need three math credits to graduate, said schools spokeswoman Liz Thompson.
NEWS
April 29, 1997
By CLYDE FORD Staff Writer, Charles Town CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - Jefferson County students who are currently sixth graders are going to have to complete algebra and geometry under new state requirements, a schools official said at Monday night's board meeting. Before, students had a choice about whether they would take algebra and other advanced mathematics, said Doug Perks, director of curriculum for the Jefferson County schools system. When the students are seventh graders, they will be in a pre-algebra class, replacing a general mathematics course, Perks said.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | October 31, 2006
WASHINGTON COUNTY - For the second consecutive year, all public high schools in Washington County met state and federal standards for adequate yearly progress. Schools officials announced the same results in August for the county's elementary and middle schools. The county is one of only six school systems statewide in which all public schools met adequate yearly progress standards, according to school officials. To meet the adequate yearly progress benchmark, schools must achieve established goals each year that put them on track to meet the 100 percent proficiency standards in reading and math by 2014 that were established in federal No Child Left Behind legislation.
NEWS
August 25, 2006
The parents of Washington County schoolchildren got some good news this week - the county's public schools are significantly better than they were just a few years ago. How do we know that? Because the Maryland State Department of Education released scores for three assessments required for graduation - algebra, biology and government - that were above state averages. If "above average" doesn't sound like a big deal, consider that Washington County had the highest percentage of students passing the algebra test -88.2 percent - of any school system in Maryland.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | January 29, 2004
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - The Jefferson County Board of Education recently increased the number of credits required for graduation in an effort to better prepare Jefferson High School students for possible careers in computer technology and the medical field, school officials said this week. Jefferson High School students are required to have 21 credits to be eligible for graduation, but that will increase to 24 credits under the plan approved by the Board of Education last week.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | June 5, 2003
pepperb@herald-mail.com The Washington County Board of Education on Tuesday voted 6-0 to purchase $344,200 worth of science, English and math textbooks for the next school year. Patricia Abernethy, Washington County Public Schools deputy superintendent for instruction, said the school system has $1.4 million in its budget for textbooks in fiscal year 2004. The School Board voted to buy $277,000 worth of middle school science textbooks to replace a book series that was last purchased in 1993.
NEWS
May 24, 2007
Here are some of the things happening today and Friday in Washington County Public Schools. Today · Bester Elementary School - Fifth-grade gym show · Boonsboro Elementary School - Science fair presentations for Mrs. Puffenberger's and Mrs. Mastonardi's classes, 6 p.m. · Boonsboro High School - High school assessments; National Honor Society Banquet at Four Points Sheraton, 7 p.m. · Clear Spring Middle...
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@heraldmail.com | February 2, 2012
Students at Greencastle-Antrim High School could see changes to their math and English curriculum, if the school board approves the school's 2012-13 Program of Studies. At Thursday's Greencastle-Antrim School Board meeting, Principal Edward Rife said the high school's department heads and improvement team have been analyzing student data to evaluate current classes. “As you are aware, (the high school) is on a warning list this year because of our PSSA (Pennsylvania System of School Assessment)
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EDUCATION
February 26, 2012
Grace Academy students in grades three to five are using the Hands-On Equations method this year to make learning algebraic concepts easier.  The instructional system uses game pieces consisting of pawns and numbered cubes, as well as a one-dimensional picture of a balance.  The use of this hands-on model helps students visualize the equations, and improves understanding and retention. The staff is also able to utilize its Smartboard technology when instructing with this method.  As part of its STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics)
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NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@heraldmail.com | February 2, 2012
Students at Greencastle-Antrim High School could see changes to their math and English curriculum, if the school board approves the school's 2012-13 Program of Studies. At Thursday's Greencastle-Antrim School Board meeting, Principal Edward Rife said the high school's department heads and improvement team have been analyzing student data to evaluate current classes. “As you are aware, (the high school) is on a warning list this year because of our PSSA (Pennsylvania System of School Assessment)
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | November 1, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- Modibo Haidara says he's having a great time at South Hagerstown High School, where he's a mentor, athlete and top student. Dibo (pronounced "DEE-bo"), as many people know him, moved to Hagerstown his freshman year. "Kids here are so friendly," he said. "I made friends right away. " Before that, he lived in Gaithersburg, Md., which he also liked. His worst time was in Hyattsville, Md., in Prince George's County. Dibo, a 17-year-old senior, said his family moved there when he was in fourth grade.
NEWS
By JANET HEIM | September 28, 2009
HALFWAY -- For almost 38 years, Greg Eversole has worked hard to build up the confidence of his Washington County students. "I've been blessed every one of those years with great experiences and great rapport with kids and teachers," said Eversole, who turns 60 on Sept. 30. As a math teacher, he also wanted to help students see that math wasn't as difficult as they've been led to believe. "I'm a very visual teacher. They have to be able to see it to understand it," said Eversole, of Halfway.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | June 13, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- A new graduation requirement for Maryland students did not keep any Washington County Public Schools students from receiving their diplomas this year. This was the first year graduating seniors had to meet the requirements for the High School Assessments (HSA), which test students' proficiency in algebra, English, biology and government. Schools Superintendent Elizabeth Morgan said all but 11 of this year's seniors met the graduation requirement -- about 99.3 percent of the 1,532 graduating seniors expected to receive high school diplomas.
NEWS
April 24, 2009
Guard member dies during MP training Missing VA Center resident found in Baltimore Man in critical condition after house fire SUV crashes into animal hospital Pre-algebra instructor is teacher of the year
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | April 22, 2009
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Jaime Mason's grandmother likes to tell people that as a child, Mason would line up her stuffed animals and dolls on the front porch and teach them their ABCs and 1,2,3's. Now, 31, Mason is teaching a more lively class -- pre-algebra at Clear Spring Middle School. She said it likely was her dedication, enthusiasm and commitment to her students and community that led her to be recognized Wednesday as Washington County Public Schools Teacher of the Year. Mason, a 1995 graduate of Clear Spring High School, said she was thrilled to win, but was not expecting the honor.
NEWS
By TIFFANY ARNOLD | May 4, 2008
SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - If ever there were a person to sell to young people the idea of pursuing math-related research, it would be John F. Nash Jr., a Nobel Prize winner. Many know of Nash through the 2001 film about his life, "A Beautiful Mind. " The film chronicled Nash's bout with mental illness and his groundbreaking research. Russell Crowe played Nash in the film. Nash will be the featured speaker at the East Coast Computer Algebra Day, held Saturday, May 10, at Shepherd University.
NEWS
May 24, 2007
Here are some of the things happening today and Friday in Washington County Public Schools. Today · Bester Elementary School - Fifth-grade gym show · Boonsboro Elementary School - Science fair presentations for Mrs. Puffenberger's and Mrs. Mastonardi's classes, 6 p.m. · Boonsboro High School - High school assessments; National Honor Society Banquet at Four Points Sheraton, 7 p.m. · Clear Spring Middle...
NEWS
by TRISH RUDDER | May 7, 2007
BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.Va. - Move over chalk and board. New technology is providing a more productive way to teach, and Berkeley Springs High School is getting good results. For more than two years now, mathematics teacher Pete Gordon has been using 21st-century technology teaching tools to help his students learn better. "These new tools allow students to learn quicker, (and) test results show they are improving," Gordon said. One is the Smart Board, a large touch-screen computerized white board used with a special pen. It has the same capabilities as a computer, with software programs for saving, printing, image drawing and font changes, and is connected to the Internet.
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