Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: HeraldMail HomeCollectionsAffordable Housing
IN THE NEWS

Affordable Housing

NEWS
October 30, 2006
Governor of Maryland Salary: $170,000 per year Term: Four years The following questions were asked to the candidates for governor of Maryland. 1. What education and life experiences qualify you to hold the office of governor of Maryland? 2. With federal money drying up for affordable housing, should the state fill the gap? Explain. 3. How would you work with local governments to solve the crisis in public school education affecting many Maryland communities?
Advertisement
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | May 16, 2008
First affordable housing program recipient recognized MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A Blue Ridge Community and Technical College employee was recognized Thursday as the first person to qualify for the county's affordable housing assistance program for public employees. Elizabeth Woolaston, a college admissions counselor, and her husband, Damion, are expected to close on a three-bedroom house later this month. The couple have two young children, who she said now will have a fenced-in yard to play in. "I'm excited," Woolaston said as Berkeley County Commissioner Steven C. Teufel presented her with a certificate.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | April 24, 2005
gregs@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - Candidates in this year's Hagerstown city elections say rapidly rising housing costs and stagnant local wages are problems that are making it harder for people to own and rent homes in the city. The affordable housing problem is one that is increasingly apparent in Hagerstown and Washington County. In some cases, candidates said, homes that sold one year ago for $100,000 now sell for nearly twice that, and rents, too, are rising. The Herald-Mail asked the 10 candidates for Hagerstown City Council what they would do to address the problem if they were elected on May 17. Making room for affordable housing Many of the candidates said they would like to pursue a so-called inclusionary zoning program, which requires developers to build some lower-cost homes in all developments, including high-end housing.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | April 6, 2005
tarar@herald-mail.com As Washington County begins studying rising property assessments and ways to make housing more affordable for low-income residents and senior citizens, some County Commissioners warned Tuesday that middle-income earners shouldn't be left out of the mix. Commissioners Vice President William J. Wivell and Commissioner Doris J. Nipps said the middle class also are struggling to keep up with climbing housing costs....
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | October 21, 2005
charlestown@herald-mail.com CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. - The Jefferson County Commission on Thursday approved a set of increases in the county's school impact fee despite the objection of one commission member who said the increase would adversely affect senior citizens and "put affordable housing further out of reach. " Commission members on a 4-1 vote decided to increase the school impact fee for single-family homes from $7,279 to $8,562, increase the fee for town houses and duplexes from $5,685 to $6,686 and increase the fee for each multifamily unit from $4,129 to $4,858.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | September 20, 2006
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - New land-use regulations being considered for Jefferson County emphasize "clustering" homes to save open space in the county, a spokesman for a firm working on the regulations said Tuesday night. Jefferson County has large tracts of agricultural areas and some people support maintaining the rural nature of the county, thinking it can lead to benefits like increased tourism. Lane Kendig of Kendig Keast Collaborative said the proposed land-use regulations his firm have developed for the county are based on the "community character" of the area.
NEWS
July 3, 2007
As Washington County's Excise Tax Task Force begins the work of studying whether the fee designed to pay for the costs of growth is adequate or fair, citizens should be wary of one argument - that cutting the fee is all that's needed to encourage construction of affordable housing. Much the same arguments held off the imposition of impact fees years ago and the result was that when growth picked up, schools, roads and other infrastructure weren't ready to handle it. If the fee is going to be cut substantially, that reduction ought to be tied to a requirement that more affordable homes be built.
NEWS
March 20, 2003
What do windmills have to do with affordable housing? We're not sure, but we look forward to an explanation from the West Virginia Housing Development Fund officials who on Tuesday approved a $1.75 million loan to a firm that develops electricity-producing windmills. The firm is U.S. Wind Force, and though the deal is not the fund's first involving economic development, the Associated Press reports that it's the first that has no link to affordable housing or helping citizens get better jobs to pay housing costs.
NEWS
September 22, 2005
The planned resettlement of 230 Meskhetian Turk refugees in Hagerstown over the next two years should add some urgency to the search for ways to create affordable housing locally. We suggest that Hagers-town officials and the Washington County government, which has a task force studying the issue, borrow successful, court-tested programs from other areas. The Turks are coming to Hagerstown because they are not considered citizens of Russia, the country in which they live now. Instead, according to The Associated Press, they are considered "guests" who have to re-register every 45 days.
NEWS
by TAMELA BAKER | March 4, 2005
tammyb@herald-mail.com ANNAPOLIS - Anyone looking for new digs in Washington County these days can attest to the soaring costs for housing. Apparently, they've got plenty of company in other parts of the state. Alarmed by the number of Maryland workers who can't afford to live where they're employed, Del. Maggie McIntosh, D-Baltimore City, sponsored legislation that would require local governments to include a provision for "workforce housing" in their comprehensive plans.
The Herald-Mail Articles
|