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NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | August 25, 2010
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- The owner of 94 dogs seized Aug. 4 from a home just outside of Martinsburg failed to appear Tuesday in Berkeley County Magistrate Court for a probable cause hearing, prompting a move to put the dogs up for adoption. Dog owner Leonard Woods Jr. requested the hearing after the dogs were seized from YipYipDog Kennels LLC at 1206 S. Raleigh St., just outside Martinsburg. Woods has not been charged in the case, but Berkeley County Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Stephanie Saunders said Tuesday the matter remains under investigation by the sheriff's department.
NEWS
July 30, 2010
Area families are invited to see real dogs and cats when they go to a special showing of "Dogs and Cats: The Revenge of Kitty Galore" Saturday at Regal Cinemas Valley Mall Stadium 16. The Humane Society of Washington County will present adoptable dogs and cats at Regal Cinemas from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 31. The humane society will also accept donations of pet-friendly items such as food, toys and blankets. Those who make a donation will receive a movie poster or face mask.
NEWS
By RIC DUGAN / Staff Photographer | August 7, 2007
Melissa Vega of Hagerstown looks over cats up for adoption Monday at the Morris' Million Cat Rescue interactive bus parked at Wal-Mart, presented by 9Lives.
NEWS
By ANDREA ROWLAND | October 30, 1999
Adoption is a gradual process that has undergone major changes since Congress passed the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997, according to adoption personnel at the Washington County Department of Social Services. The Act was a "big thrust" by the federal government to increase adoptions so children don't languish in foster care, said Richard C. Snyder Jr., foster care and adoptions resource home coordinator. The legislation's goal is to help children waiting in foster care to move more quickly into safe and permanent homes, according to the Children's Defense Fund Web site.
NEWS
By ANDREA ROWLAND | October 30, 1999
"You don't need to go to Korea or other places to adopt. There are plenty of kids who need homes right here in Washington County," said adoptive mother Diana Kegarise. The county Department of Social Services is currently seeking loving homes like that of the Kegarise family for 14 children of both sexes legally ready for adoption, said Ann Pittman, foster care and adoption supervisor. Some of those children are older, have special needs, are emotionally disturbed or are developmentally delayed, Pittman said.
NEWS
by BONNIE H. BRECHBILL | January 4, 2004
bonnieb@herald-mail.com A pregnant Russian widow left her 10-month-old son, Yuri, at an orphanage in the Tula Oblast region south of Moscow in 1989. The baby was ill and she could not afford medical care for him. A few weeks later, she returned with her newborn, Alexi, and left him there, too. The brothers were moved to another orphanage when Yuri turned 4, a common practice as children in state care in Russia are grouped by age. But in 1996, the brothers were separated when Alexi was moved to the Severo-Ageyevsky internat - a boarding school orphanage - in a remote area.
NEWS
December 4, 2008
The third annual Home 4 the Holidays, a campaign to promote the adoption of shelter animals this holiday season, is under way at the Humane Society of Washington County. In an effort to attract attention to the animals available for adoption, the shelter is joining forces with Washington County Public Schools, Washington County businesses, Antietam Cable Television, Longmeadow Animal Hospital, 4-Legged Friends Pet Services, Iams Pet Foods and the Helen Woodward Animal Center to promote shelter animal adoptions.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | September 19, 2007
The Humane Society of Washington County plans to reopen its dog adoption kennels on Thursday after closing them Aug. 31 in response to an outbreak of canine parvovirus, Humane Society spokeswoman Katherine Cooker said. The shelter has not had a case of the potentially-deadly disease since Sept. 5 and staff feel it will be safe to reopen, Cooker said. The dogs had been confined to their kennels to prevent the spread of the disease, which is transmitted through dogs' fecal matter, she said.
NEWS
by KATE COLEMAN | July 30, 2004
katec@herald-mail.com WILLIAMSPORT - Last December, Melissa "Missi" and Matthew Dittman got the call they'd been waiting for. A baby boy born in Seoul, South Korea, would be theirs to adopt. Their prayers for a child were answered halfway around the world. They had not prayed alone. When the baby arrived at Dulles International Airport on June 21, more than a dozen people welcomed him. Among them were the pastor of St. Andrew Presbyterian Church in Williamsport, Mark Sandell; his wife, Annette; and their sons, 17-year-old twins Kevin and Brian, and 13-year-old Keith.
NEWS
By MARIE GILBERT | November 14, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- To say that Hooper was doggone cute was an understatement. And he seemed to know it, showing off for anyone who passed his way. He was looking for a playmate. He was looking for attention. But, mostly, Hooper was looking for a home. Part shih tzu, part schnauzer, the black-and-white year-old dog was among the animals that attended a pet adoption party on Saturday at Central Dawgma on Pennsylvania Avenue. The animals were provided by the Humane Society of Washington County.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | August 13, 2013
The Waynesboro Area School Board on Tuesday committed to offering tax savings to a potential new business at Wharf Road Industrial Park. Tax abatement will be offered through a Local Economic Revitalization Tax Abatement (LERTA) program. A manufacturer that could employ 50 to 60 people is looking to open a factory on Lot 8 in the industrial park in Zullinger, Pa., Washington Township (Pa.) Manager Mike Christopher told the school board. He did not identify the business during the meeting.
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NEWS
By HOLLY SHOK | holly.shok@herald-mail.com | August 12, 2013
The Williamsport Town Council voted unanimously Monday night to adopt fine increases for some town parking violations. The fine for parking on a red line will increase from $5 to $10, and from $10 to $15 for parking on a red line in the wrong direction. The fine for blocking an alley will be raised from $5 to $10 and from $5 to $25 for parking in front of a fire hydrant. The fine increases will become effective Aug. 31. The council agreed to approve the hike after Councilman William “Bill” Green expressed concern that some of the parking fines appeared to be too low, according to previous reports in The Herald-Mail.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | August 7, 2013
Doug and Rhonda Shatzer know firsthand how much time, money and emotional investment is involved with adoption. The Shatzers, of Greencastle, adopted their two daughters from China. Through an organization they are helping to form, they hope to assist others with funds and information to make the process eaasier. “Everyone tells us how blessed the girls are to have us, but in reality we're the ones blessed to have them in our lives,” Rhonda Shatzer said. Doug Shatzer, Randall Sellers and Keith McCleaf are working to start an organization they call Bring the Children Home.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
The Berkeley County Council recently unanimously adopted a public parking plan as part of an effort to improve access to the county's administration building at 400 W. Stephen St. All of the spaces in the county's lot off Raleigh Street for what is known as the Dunn Building will be available to the public as part of the plan that was implemented. The parking lot includes a number of spaces for the handicapped. The West Stephen Street parking lot, which also can be accessed via the Berkeley County Judicial Center, will be a mix of public parking and designated county employee spaces, officials said.
NEWS
June 28, 2013
The Berkeley County Council on Thursday unanimously adopted a public parking plan as part of an effort to improve access to the county's administration building at 400 W. Stephen St. All of the spaces in the county's lot off Raleigh Street for what is known as the Dunn Building will be available to the public as part of the plan that was implemented. The parking lot includes a numbers of spaces for the handicapped. The West Stephen Street parking lot, which also can be accessed via the Berkeley County Judicial Center, will be a mix of public parking and designated county employee spaces, officials said.
NEWS
By HOLLY SHOK | holly.shok@herald-mail.com | June 11, 2013
The Hagerstown City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to introduce an ordinance that will impose a 10 percent fee on the city's water and sewer customers who are late paying their utility bills. The ordinance - which the five-member council began considering after several hundred utility customers were delinquent with their bills this spring - is slated to be adopted next week after a formal vote at the council's June 18 work session. It will take effect 30 days later. Michael S. Spiker, the city's director of utilities, has said a late fee notice would be sent to water and sewer customers 21 days after their quarterly bill is due. The late fee for one bill would not be compounded if a customer failed to pay the next bill, Spiker has said.
LIFESTYLE
May 24, 2013
Name: Leticia Age: 3 1/2 years old Color: Solid white Breed: Domestic short hair ID: A17291954 Leticia is a deaf, sweet cat looking for a loving home to call her own. Her disability doesn't stop her from being a great friend. Leticia is available for adoption at PetSmart, 17740 Garland Groh Blvd., Hagerstown. Many other animals are available for adoption at The Humane Society of Washington County, 13011 Maugansville Road, north of Hagerstown. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday; 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.
NEWS
May 21, 2013
Twice a year, members of Rotary Club of Hagerstown-Sunrise go out to Sharpsburg Pike for a highway cleanup morning as part of Maryland's Adopt-A-Highway program. The program provides a way for community groups to show their state pride and help keep the state litter-free. Since the program started in 1989, SHA has partnered with more than 120,000 Marylanders who have cleaned and enhanced more than 15,000 miles of roadside.    
NEWS
By C.J. LOVELACE | cj.lovelace@herald-mail.com | May 12, 2013
Reducing obstacles for adoption, decreasing euthanasia rates and increasing the number of animal control field service officers are top priorities listed by Michael Lausen, the recently hired executive director of the Humane Society of Washington County. Lausen, who took over the executive director job Feb. 4, said recently that the humane society had 142 adoptions, including 73 cats and 65 dogs, in March - its highest recorded one-month total ever - simply by relaxing the requirements in the adoption application process.
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