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Adequate Yearly Progress

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EDUCATION
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | July 2, 2011
Although 17 Washington County elementary and middle schools failed to meet state proficiency standards in at least one area in the past school year, Assistant Superintendent Donna Hanlin said individual students and groups or grades of students made improvements. "I think when you don't recognize the growth that schools make, it has to have a detrimental effect on morale," Hanlin said. The results released Wednesday by the Maryland State Department of Education stem from reading and math assessment tests given to grades three to eight in March.
NEWS
by ERIN CUNNINGHAM | January 24, 2007
HAGERSTOWN - A state official on Tuesday told the Washington County Board of Education that the school system is performing better than most across the state. He also contradicted information he gave to The Herald-Mail in December regarding the school system's overall status in one recording area. Gary Heath, assistant state superintendent for the division of accountability and assessment, was asked to give a presentation about adequate yearly progress and the status of the county public school system during the business meeting.
NEWS
November 30, 1999
For the second consecutive year, all public high schools in Washington County met state and federal standards for adequate yearly progress. Read the full story in Tuesday's Herald-Mail newspapers.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | September 22, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- Washington County Public Schools was one of three public school systems in the state of Maryland to achieve Adequate Yearly Progress at every school during the 2008-09 academic year. Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) is used primarily to determine the annual progress that students make in reading and math. It is a measurement defined by the federal No Child Left Behind Act. "I think that is a pretty extraordinary accomplishment," said Jeremy Jakoby, supervisor of testing and accountability for Washington County Public Schools.
NEWS
By ERIN CUNNINGHAM | August 16, 2007
WASHINGTON COUNTY - All Washington County elementary schools met adequate yearly progress standards for the third consecutive year, officials announced Wednesday. All but one of the county's middle schools met the same federal standards. Adequate yearly progress (AYP) is determined by students' scores on Maryland School Assessments. Those results were released in June. Western Heights Middle School did not meet adequate yearly progress and is now a school "in need of local attention," as determined by the Maryland State Department of Education.
NEWS
November 30, 1999
Hedgesville High School received a national High Schools That Work Pacesetter School award Wednesday in New Orleans. Hedgesville High School is one of only 20 high schools in the nation and one of two in West Virginia to receive the Pacesetter Award in 2007. To earn this recognition the school met a variety of criteria, including meeting the Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) criteria of the federal No Child Left Behind Act. See Thursday's Herald-Mail newspapers for the full story.
NEWS
by SCOTT BUTKI | July 1, 2004
scottb@herald-mail.com Eastern Elementary School teachers were "ecstatic," some even crying with joy, when they learned Eastern would be removed from a list of schools facing sanctions for low test scores, Principal Kathy Stiles said Wednesday. Eastern and Hancock elementary schools will be removed from the list of Schools in Need of Improvement because of improved scores on the Maryland School Assessment, according to information released this week by the Maryland State Department of Education.
NEWS
November 4, 2004
School board honors teen magician The Washington County Board of Education on Wednesday honored Harry "Buddy" Barton, 15, a magician who has been diagnosed with chronic liver disease. Last month Barton, of Hagerstown, was named Washington County's Most Wonderful Citizen for 2004. He will attend the state event, Maryland You Are Beautiful, on Nov. 10, at 7 p.m., at St. John's College in Annapolis. Barton travels to various activities and events, where he performs magic to lift the spirits of his audience.
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OPINION
By TIM ROWLAND | timr@herald-mail.com | June 3, 2012
Will Rogers said of communism, “It's a good idea, but it doesn't work.” No Child Left Behind was a nice thought, but it didn't work either. So, with the same quiet discretion with which you would usher a daft relative away from the wedding party, the remnants of President Bush's signature educational reform are being disassembled piece by piece. This week, Maryland became the most recent state to receive a waiver from the act's more burdensome requirements. No one I've heard from is shedding any tears.
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NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | December 6, 2011
Waynesboro Area School District students are performing well on statewide standardized tests in math and reading, principals told the school board Tuesday. Elementary school principals talked to the school board about student achievement Tuesday. Last month, Waynesboro Area Senior High School Principal Christopher Dennis offered a similar report.    Pennsylvania schools are asked to make “adequate yearly progress,” a classification aligned with the federal No Child Left Behind initiative.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | August 14, 2011
The percentage of Williamsport Elementary School's fifth-graders who scored proficient or advanced on the Maryland School Assessment science test increased from 67 percent in 2010 to 82.1 percent in the last school year. Opinions differ as to whether the size of the fifth-grade class from year to year influenced the improvement. In 2010, 67 out of 100 students scored at least at the proficient level, and in 2011, 69 out of 84 students scored at least proficient, according to the Maryland State Department of Education's website at www.mdreportcard.org . It takes a team effort to experience such improvement because fifth-graders are being tested on science concepts they learned during earlier grades, too, Principal Jana Palmer said.
EDUCATION
July 2, 2011
Results of the 2011 Maryland School Assessment tests for grades 3 to 8 were released Wednesday. This included math and reading results for 32 elementary and middle schools in Washington County Public Schools. Results for Hancock Middle-Senior High School won't be available until High School Assessment results are released later this summer because the school is a joint middle and high school. Wednesday's release included data on whether schools, student subgroups and grade levels met Adequate Yearly Progress goals set for the 2011 school year.
EDUCATION
By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com | July 2, 2011
Although 17 Washington County elementary and middle schools failed to meet state proficiency standards in at least one area in the past school year, Assistant Superintendent Donna Hanlin said individual students and groups or grades of students made improvements. "I think when you don't recognize the growth that schools make, it has to have a detrimental effect on morale," Hanlin said. The results released Wednesday by the Maryland State Department of Education stem from reading and math assessment tests given to grades three to eight in March.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | September 14, 2010
WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Franklin County, Pa., school districts overall made Adequate Yearly Progress in 2009-10, but some schools had issues with subgroups like special-education students or those who are economically disadvantaged. Pennsylvania's AYP is tied to the federal No Child Left Behind initiative, which calls for all students to be "proficient" on grade-level, standardized tests by 2014. AYP status was released Tuesday by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. For Pennsylvania schools, 56 percent of students were supposed to be ranked "proficient" or "advanced" in math on the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA)
NEWS
By DANA BROWN | September 2, 2010
GREENCASTLE, Pa. -- Greencastle-Antrim School District met or exceeded state Adequate Yearly Progress benchmarks for reading and math last school year, Director of Educational Operations Bob Crider told the school board Thursday evening. The board reviewed Pennsylvania System of School Assessment results for the 2009-2010 school year during a work session where principals from the primary, elementary, middle and high schools presented data specific to each school. Crider told the board that as a district, Greencastle-Antrim's results met or exceeded the benchmarks of 63 percent in reading and 56 percent in math.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | August 16, 2010
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- Twenty Eastern Panhandle schools have met minimum Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) standards for five consecutive years, according to assessment numbers released Monday by the West Virginia Department of Education. Eight schools have met AYP in Berkeley County for the last five years, including Hedgesville High School, Inwood Primary School and six elementary schools. In Jefferson County, Shepherdstown Middle School and six elementary schools have met the minimum standards for the last five years.
NEWS
By JULIE E. GREENE | July 24, 2010
o Maryland School Assessment results for grades 3 through 8 In August, parents will find out how their children performed on the Maryland School Assessment reading and math tests that public school students took in March. But what does it mean to them? To their children? To teachers, principals or administrators at the central office of Washington County Public Schools? County education officials, including school principals, have started diving into the piles of data for each school, whether or not each met proficiency standards, so strategies can be formed for each school to help students improve and meet this school year's proficiency standards, said Michael Markoe, assistant superintendent for student and staff support.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | July 20, 2010
WASHINGTON COUNTY -- Twenty-six of Washington County's 32 public elementary and middle schools met proficiency standards this year, the school system said Tuesday, when 2010 Maryland School Assessment results were released. Three elementary schools -- Bester, Williamsport and Winter Street -- and three middle schools -- Northern, Springfield and Western Heights -- did not meet proficiency standards, the school system said in a press release. Last year, every public elementary and middle school in the school system met minimum proficiency levels, known as Adequate Yearly Progress, or AYP. Adequate Yearly Progress is based on the percentage of students who score at or above the proficiency level on Maryland School Assessment tests.
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