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By DAVE McMILLION | October 7, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- A Martinsburg attorney representing former AB&C Group workers in a back-wages lawsuit over two local AB&C plant shutdowns earlier this year said Monday that he and two other lawyers are now expecting to represent hundreds of former AB&C workers in the case now that a judge has ruled the suit can proceed as a class action. Two former AB&C workers initially brought the suit and attorney David Hammer said Monday he now expects to help represent more than 400 former AB&C workers since Berkeley County Circuit Judge Christopher Wilkes ruled Sept.
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NEWS
September 17, 2008
HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. -- ABC's Good Morning America will be making a train stop Thursday in Jefferson County, W.Va. The long-running national morning show will broadcast live from Harpers Ferry National Historical Park starting at 7 a.m. The national news show's broadcast is part of the "50 States in 50 Days" whistle-stop train tour that leads up to the Nov. 4 presidential election. Marsha Wassel, the park's public information officer, said the public is invited to attend and watch the broadcast, but she is asking visitors not to bring signs to help maintain the park's historical character.
NEWS
July 10, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. (AP) -- Nearly 400 workers who lost their jobs when AB&C closed call centers in Martinsburg and Ranson in March will have to wait for their final paychecks. U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Patrick Flatley ruled July 2 that bankruptcy laws prevent him from immediately releasing about $345,000 to the laid-off workers. A class-action lawsuit filed in March in Berkeley County Circuit Court seeks to recover three weeks of wages for the former employees. The company filed for bankruptcy on April 4. Attorney Kathy Santa Barbara, who represents the employees, says she may appeal Flatley's ruling.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | June 13, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. -- Hundreds of laid-off AB&C Group workers will have to wait longer for pay they say is due them after the bulk-mailing company suddenly went out of business March 14. In U.S. District Court in Martinsburg Thursday afternoon, local attorney Kathy Santa Barbara pushed federal bankruptcy judge Patrick Flatley to allow employees to be paid some of their wages from the $345,000 that she claimed was set aside for payroll, among other...
NEWS
May 25, 2008
More than 150 construction professionals participated in the Associated Builders and Contractors Inc., Cumberland Valley Chapter, fourth-annual general contractors showcase at Four Points Sheraton in Hagerstown. General Contractors who set up displays were: Brechbill and Helman Construction Inc.; Callas Contractors Inc.; GRC General Contractor Inc.; Minghini's General Contractors Inc.; Morgan Keller Construction; and Waynesboro Construction Co. Inc. Sponsors for the event were: HPG Windows and Doors; Just Wood Industries; The Blue Book Building & Construction; and United Rental Aerial Equipment.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | April 11, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - One of the lawyers representing workers who lost their jobs when two AB&C Group plants shut down recently has told two local prosecutors that he believes state criminal laws might have been broken. In letters sent to Berkeley County Prosecuting Attorney Pamela-Games Neely and Jefferson County Prosecuting Attorney Michael D. Thompson, Martinsburg lawyer Paul Taylor said there is a state law which says that any person or corporation which disposes or relocates assets with the intent to deprive employees their wages is guilty of a felony.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | April 5, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Former employees of AB&C Group Inc., who were laid off last month, could receive some of the wages they are owed as early as next week, attorneys said Friday during a court hearing. Two boxes of paychecks for workers laid off March 14, the day they were to be paid, were turned over Friday to an attorney appointed by 23rd Judicial Circuit Judge Gina M. Groh to marshal the custody of company assets seized by a court order signed Monday. Before distributing the March 9 payroll checks, attorney Carmela Cesare, the court-appointed receiver, is expected to verify that the checks can be cashed and photocopy them for the benefit of two civil lawsuits filed against the company since it shut down.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | April 4, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. -- Former employees of AB&C Group Inc., who were laid off last month, could receive some of the wages they are owed as early as next week, attorneys said Friday during a court hearing. Two boxes of paychecks for workers laid off March 14, the day they were to be paid, were turned over Friday to an attorney appointed by 23rd Judicial Circuit Judge Gina M. Groh to marshal the custody of company assets seized by a court order signed Monday. Before distributing the March 9 payroll checks, attorney Carmela Cesare, the court-appointed receiver, is expected to verify that the checks can be cashed and photocopy them for the benefit of two civil lawsuits filed against the company since it shut down.
NEWS
By HEATHER KEELS | April 1, 2008
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. -- A judge signed an order Monday calling for the seizure of funds and property of the recently-closed AB&C Group so the assets will be available to pay unpaid wages due to laid-off workers, court documents show. Under the Jefferson County Circuit Court order, a court-appointed "special receiver" will take control of property and funds in the mailing company's Ranson, W.Va., and Martinsburg, W.Va., locations. "It stops the company from moving its assets from the building," explained Paul G. Taylor, an attorney representing laid-off AB&C workers in a lawsuit.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | March 26, 2008
RANSON, W.Va. -- Hundreds of laid-off AB&C Group workers learned Tuesday about starting over. The former employees showed up at the Lions Club on Third Avenue to find out how to recoup lost wages, get food stamps, register for school clothing vouchers and get Medicaid assistance in the wake of two company plant shutdowns. Workers were told not to be shy or too proud to ask for help because they have paid for the state and federal assistance through the years that they have been working.
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