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Featured Articles from Herald-Mail

News | June 20, 1998
by RIC DUGAN / staff photographer enlargement By RICHARD F. BELISLE Staff Writer MERCERSBURG, Pa. - Four Pennsylvania teenagers were killed Friday afternoon when their car skidded sideways into a tree with such force that four of the five people inside were thrown out, including one who landed 50 feet away, said Pennsylvania State Police. The passenger who wasn't thrown from the car, Erin Cohen, 14, address unknown, was flown to York Hospital in York, Pa., where she was listed in satisfactory condition Friday night.
NEWS
February 13, 2012
Most people know that February is Black History Month. Many have heard of many famous and important contributors to the advancement of this great nation, such as Frederick Douglass, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., Thurgood Marshall and many others. However, my favorite man contributed immensely to our nation and his race. He was a pioneer and advocate of agriculture, and by the end of this article, I trust you will see his contributions all around you. One of my favorite Americans is George Washington Carver.  From inauspicious and dramatic beginnings, Carver became one of the nation's greatest educators and agricultural researchers.  From an early age, he developed a keen interest in plants.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | August 5, 2012
The last Civil War soldier to witness the fighting at Burnside Bridge during the Battle of Antietam died nearly a century ago. But a 170-year-old eastern sycamore tree that abuts the north end of the stone bridge continues to thrive. Joe Calzarette, natural resources manager at Antietam National Battlefield, said the tree undoubtedly was hit by gunfire as thousands of Union and Confederate soldiers fought for control of the bridge on Sept. 17, 1862. “Boy, if it could talk,” Calzarette said of the tree, known as a witness tree because it was there at the time of the battle.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | February 24, 2012
As the first African-American woman to achieve the rank of major general in the U.S. Army, Marcia M. Anderson helped inspire Letterkenny Army Depot employees Friday as they observed Black History Month. In a keynote speech focusing on “Black Women in American Culture and History,” the 30-year career soldier spoke of her personal philosophy for success. “It's not your ZIP code or your family history that determines where you end up in life so much as what's in your heart and what's in your brain,” Anderson told Letterkenny employees.
NEWS
April 30, 2001
JEB Stuart IV addresses CSA descendants By JULIE E. GREENE julieg@herald-mail.com FUNKSTOWN - Just as with many families, the Civil War divided J.E.B. Stuart's family. The man who would become a Confederate general named his son after his father-in-law, Philip Saint George Cooke. When Cooke chose to support the North during the war, Stuart changed his son's name to James Ewell Brown Stuart Jr. That story was one of several passed along Saturday by J.E.B.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | June 21, 2005
McCONNELLSBURG, PA. waynesboro@herald-mail.com A Jane Doe murder case that was 10 years old stumped police in two states until a missing persons Web site brought the agencies together to discover the woman's identity. The victim was identified in December 2004 through DNA tests from her tooth as Cynthia Louis Vanderbeek, 47. On Thursday, U.S. Marshals acting on a warrant issued by Fulton County Magisterial District Judge Wendy Richards Mellott arrested Vanderbeek's husband, Stephen Alfred Vanderbeek, of 33 Corsa Terrace, Apt. 11A, Ridgewood, N.J. Vanderbeek, 51, is charged with criminal homicide, first-degree murder, third-degree murder and aggravated assault, according to an affidavit of probable cause on file in Mellott's office.
LIFESTYLE
BY TIFFANY ARNOLD | tiffanya@herald-mail.com | February 8, 2011
A steady stream of morning customers flowed in and out of the Spickler's Market, picking up everyday items - everything from pop and cigarettes to produce and household items. Sandwiches and cold cuts are sold at the deli counter in the back of the store. The cashier is at the front. Melissa Shives, a new cashier, works the 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. shift. She said it gets the busiest between 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m., the lunch rush, she said. "Yeah, we've got our regulars," she said between transactions on a recent Friday morning.
NEWS
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY | September 2, 1998
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. - A Berkeley County couple whose daughter was killed by a drunken driver being chased by West Virginia State Police settled a claim Tuesday against the parent company of a television crew that accompanied police. Wrongful death claims against a Bunker Hill bar also were settled, according to Berkeley County Circuit Court records. --cont. from news page -- The settlement amount is confidential, but the attorney for Amanda Smailes' parents, John and Cynthia Smailes, said the claim is "very substantial.
NEWS
by RICHARD F. BELISLE | June 20, 2005
waynesboro@herald-mail.com WAYNESBORO, Pa. - Walk among the belts, pulleys, grindstones, augers, conveyors, dryers, crushers and cleaners in the five-story brick and stone Shank's Mill and it's hard to grasp that most of its machinery is run by a 25-horsepower water wheel that's pushed around by water from a small stream. Machinery hardly recognizable today would have been day-to-day normal to those who ran gristmills in the United States in the 18th, 19th and early-20th centuries.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | October 7, 2003
andrear@herald-mail.com Be real. That's the best advice for winning a school election. It worked for Adam Hockensmith, who won his run for president of the Student Government Association at South Hagerstown High School this year. Adam narrowly beat fellow senior Trang Phan for the position - and he did it by being sincere, upbeat, funny and confident, he says. "I just tried to be myself, to be positive, and not to have a fake niceness about me," says Adam, 16, of Hagerstown.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | May 26, 2004
martinsburg.@herald-mail.com The trial started with a request that jurors close their eyes. The eight women and four men hearing the case involving Brian W. Strobridge, a dump-truck driver charged with causing a wreck that led to three deaths, obliged and Berkeley County Prosecutor Pamela Games-Neely told them to envision a hot, gorgeous July day. A nurse was driving her car along W.Va. 9, east of Martinsburg that day. Behind her were two young men in a Jeep Wrangler, having a good time, maybe waving at passing cars, Games-Neely said.
NEWS
October 7, 2012
The problem: In his Sept. 30 email, Williamsport resident Beau Ouimette supplied The Herald-Mail with several photos showing cracking and deterioration of concrete support columns under eastbound Interstate 70 where it crosses Licking Creek, about seven miles southeast of Hancock. “Some of the cracks in the concrete run from the bottom to the top of the supports,” Ouimette wrote in his email. “I would like to think that this is being monitored by DOT (Department of Transportation)
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