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News | By MARLO BARNHART | September 12, 2009
Editor's note: Each Sunday, The Herald-Mail publishes "A Life Remembered. " This continuing series takes a look back -- through the eyes of family, friends, co-workers and others -- at a member of the community who died recently. Today's "A Life Remembered" is about Alan Aubrey Marriner, who died Aug. 31 at the age of 89. His obituary was published in the Sept. 2 edition of The Herald-Mail. Alan Aubrey Marriner would have been the first to describe himself as a thinker. Right up to the end of his life, he was learning new languages and reading everything he could get his hands on. But the life Alan lived bore out that he also was very much a doer -- both in his community and where his family was concerned.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | August 5, 2012
The last Civil War soldier to witness the fighting at Burnside Bridge during the Battle of Antietam died nearly a century ago. But a 170-year-old eastern sycamore tree that abuts the north end of the stone bridge continues to thrive. Joe Calzarette, natural resources manager at Antietam National Battlefield, said the tree undoubtedly was hit by gunfire as thousands of Union and Confederate soldiers fought for control of the bridge on Sept. 17, 1862. “Boy, if it could talk,” Calzarette said of the tree, known as a witness tree because it was there at the time of the battle.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | July 11, 2008
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- The body exhumed Wednesday morning from a shallow grave behind a mobile home near Falling Waters, W.Va., was verified to be James Darrell Tucker, Berkeley County Sheriff W. Randy Smith said Thursday. The cause of death of the 34-year-old Falling Waters man was blunt force trauma, Smith said of preliminary autopsy results released by the West Virginia Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Charleston. "He wasn't shot, wasn't stabbed," said Smith, who reported in a press release that Tucker received multiple skull fractures.
NEWS
by DON AINES | August 26, 2004
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, PA. - No body or murder weapon were found and the physical evidence consisted primarily of two shell casings found 14 years apart at different locations, making the 1985 disappearance of Melvin Snyder a perfect case for "Forensic Files. " The disappearance of the Greencastle, Pa., man and the investigation, trial and conviction of Ronald W. Harshman were featured in an episode Wednesday night on Court TV. Franklin County District Attorney John F. Nelson and Assistant District Attorney Angela Krom, who together prosecuted the case, were told by producers the show would air tonight.
NEWS
by ARV VOSS/Motor Matters | July 15, 2005
Harley-Davidson has commemorated anniversaries before with special edition models, but I don't recall in recent history a specific model that celebrated its own anniversary. The Motor Company alters that history with the FLSTFI Fat Boy 15th Anniversary edition bike. Harley produced a limited number of Screamin' Eagle Fat Boys for the 2005 model year, but the 15th anniversary bike isn't a product of the Custom Vehicle Operation Screamin' Eagle lineup. Despite that fact, the 15th Anniversary Fat Boy is a limited edition bike that comes stock with a motor that's a full 100cc bigger - 1550cc to be exact.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | March 25, 1999
Matthew Ross Himelright was sentenced Tuesday morning to serve 25 years in prison for an armed carjacking last spring that began in Hagerstown and ended in the mountains of North Carolina. "This could have been a murder," said Washington County Circuit Judge Kennedy Boone, who heard from the victim, Philip James Bean, and Bean's mother. Himelright's Feb. 25 trial was halted when he entered an Alford plea to armed carjacking, a crime that carries a maximum 30-year sentence.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 28, 2013
Sandra Volneck has faced many challenges over the years, but the hardest thing she ever had to do was look at her 15-year-old daughter's battered, lifeless body before closing the casket and burying her. “I wouldn't wish that on nobody. I'll never get over it,” Volneck said last week. “Never.” Twenty-nine years later and recovering from surgery for lung cancer, Volneck still does not know who killed her only child. Maryland State Police recovered Lorraine “Lori” Zimmerman's body from a wooded area outside Boonsboro in April 1984.
NEWS
Chad Smith | July 20, 2012
If you've ever had a conversation with me, you'd learn quickly I am a fact freak. I've got a head full of little annoying facts that would probably only be good for an appearance on "Jeopardy. " So today, I'm going to share with you some of the completely random fitness facts that float around in my brain on a regular basis, so in turn you can relay them to your friends at completely random times. It will make you sound brilliant, and you might actually get to meet my favorite Canadian, Alex Trebek.
NEWS
BY Christine L. Moats | April 1, 2002
Q: What can I do to prepare for my first doctor's visit without one of my parents? A: To be prepared, do the following: Bring your medical records or have them transferred from your previous doctor's office. Bring your insurance card with you to your visit. Arrive early for your first visit as you will most likely have to fill out paperwork. If you haven't been feeling well, make a list of the symptoms you've been experiencing to share with your doctor. Write down any questions or concerns that you would like to discuss with the doctor.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | October 11, 2011
A cab ride from Waynesboro, Pa., to Hagerstown. Sounds simple enough, but cabbie Kathy Rhodes said instead she found herself in the middle of a harrowing ordeal a week ago when she watched her rider get out of the cab, allegedly force his way into a house on Reiff Church Road and hit someone inside. The man then jumped back into the cab as she tried to drive away. But Rhodes - with the help of a Washington County 911 dispatcher on her cellphone - hatched a plan to go to a nearby McDonald's restaurant, where police were able to capture the man after a struggle.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | February 18, 2011
A Masonic apron presented to George Washington at Mount Vernon by the Marquis de Lafayette in 1784, and thought to have been lost for two centuries, has been hanging in a Masonic meeting room in downtown Shepherdstown all this time. The apron has been in the Mt. Nebo Lodge No. 91 A.F. & A. M. on East German Street since the early 1800s. Thomas Hammond, who married Mildred Washington, George Washington's niece, bought the apron from Martha Washington's estate for $6. The couple moved to Charles Town, W.Va.
NEWS
Lynn Little | July 20, 2011
Eating ice cream to beat the summer heat is one of America's favorite pastimes.   Homemade ice cream can be a special treat, but it can also become a threat because of salmonellosis. While commercially manufactured ice cream is typically made with pasteurized eggs or egg products, recipes for homemade ice cream often use raw eggs in the base mixture. If your favorite ice cream recipe uses uncooked eggs, it is time to replace or revise it. Those raw eggs may contain salmonella bacteria that can cause foodborne illness.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | June 11, 2012
Howard Swint, “a common man running a common campaign to represent the common people,” wants to wrest the 12-year Second District U.S. House seat from Republican incumbent Shelley Moore Capito. Swint, 53, of Charleston, W.Va., said Monday he is running such a low-key campaign that he has yet to raise “enough money to count.” He doesn't accept campaign contributions from corporations or special-interest groups. “I only accept individual donations,” he said. Swint seems undaunted that he's facing a mountainous fight for Capito's seat.
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