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Lifestyle | By MARIE GILBERT and marieg@herald-mail.com | February 18, 2011
This is the winter of Ruth Murphy's discontent. With month after month of snow, ice and frigid temperatures, the 75-year-old woman is having trouble staying positive. But it wasn't always that way. There was a time when Murphy enjoyed brisk weather, sledding with her children and family ski trips. But age, failing eyesight and arthritis have changed her lifestyle. Instead of taking to the outdoors, she takes to her house. "With health problems, I feel safer staying put,"  Murphy said.
NEWS
By DON AINES | May 26, 2003
chambersburg@herald-mail.com SOUTH MOUNTAIN, Pa. - Sixteen million American men and women served in uniform during World War II, and the village and surrounding community of South Mountain sent its share of sons and daughters when the nation called. Seventy-four veterans of that war are buried in Strang's Cemetery, nearly half the veterans from seven wars who found their final resting place in this Guilford Township meadow. More than 50 people gathered in the cemetery Sunday for an outdoor service by the New Baltimore Church of God in honor of the veterans.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | July 19, 2008
View the Monster Jam slideshow. WASHINGTON COUNTY - Loud, growling monster trucks wowed the crowd Friday at Hagerstown Speedway. Even the names of the trucks - El Toro Loco, Stone Crusher - were intimidating. The trucks ooze muscles and machismo. Each is about 11 feet high and 12 feet wide, weighs more than 9,000 pounds, and uses tires at least 66 inches high and 43 inches wide, according to a Monster Jam fact sheet. As the pumped-up trucks screamed around the dirt track, the PA announcer yelled with excitement and thousands of people in the stands, including many children, roared, adding to the din. Several fans said Friday that noise is part of the experience, but some, particularly parents, looked for ways to minimize it. Shaun Rose of Hagerstown bought two pairs of ear plugs from a vendor.
NEWS
April 21, 2010
Compact fluorescent light bulbs Pros Uses less energy than incandescent bulbs, reducing demand for electricity and amount of mercury emitted from power plants. An Energy Star-qualified CFL bulb will use 75 percent less energy than an incandescent bulb. An Energy Star-qualified CFL bulb will last about 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb. An Energy Star-qualified CFL bulb will pay for itself in about 6 months. Cons Disposal isn't convenient because bulbs contain mercury.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | October 23, 2012
Washington County's newly revised animal control ordinance includes a leash law. The Washington County Board of Commissioners unanimously approved the ordinance on Tuesday, more than three months after holding a public hearing. The new ordinance also defines “excessive noise” by an animal. The leash law adds a new layer to the county's requirement that animals can't roam “at large.” The new version of the ordinance says “every Dog must, when off the property of its Owner, be restrained by a leash.” Even before the leash law, though, the county already required animals to be “under the immediate control, charge, or possession of the Owner or other responsible person capable of physically restraining the animal.” Before passing the new version, the county commissioners discussed finer points of the law and whether it could be improved further.
OBITUARIES
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | June 4, 2011
Today would have been Meggan Wolfensberger's 27th birthday, a birthday she shared with her only son and middle child, Ashton Stouffer, who is 4 today. Instead of celebrating with cake, candles and balloons, Debbie Wolfensberger sits in her Virginia Avenue home, wondering how it came to be that her home is filled with many of her daughter's belongings. Meggan died May 17, less than a year after being diagnosed with cervical cancer in August 2010. Her doctor had given her two years to live.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | matthew.umstead@herald-mail.com | June 27, 2011
A 38-year-old woman accused in the 2007 shooting death of her estranged husband could serve three to 15 years in prison after she pleaded no contest Monday in Berkeley County Circuit Court to one count of voluntary manslaughter. Maria Decicio-Smith, who is in jail, is scheduled to be sentenced Sept. 9 by 23rd Judicial Circuit Judge Christopher C. Wilkes. Decicio-Smith, who was indicted in 2008 on one count of first-degree murder, became emotional during the plea hearing and interrupted her attorney to tell the judge that she wanted to “say her piece.” Decicio-Smith’s trial was to begin Tuesday.
NEWS
by TARA REILLY | July 2, 2006
EL PASO, TEXAS - As Mary Anne Sullivan-Scott left Texas to return to West Virginia last week, a U.S. Army colonel placed a gold coin in her hand. "Never quit" was inscribed on the coin. It was one of her son's favorite quotes. The words, while simple, summed up the positive attitude of her son, Joshua L. "Doc" Kidwell, who died last week, she said. Kidwell, 21, an Army specialist, died June 24 at the Thomason Trauma Center in El Paso. Kidwell sustained head injuries June 23 when he jumped out of a moving truck during an argument with his wife, El Paso police and military officials said in a story that was published June 27 in The El Paso Times.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | December 27, 2006
For Audrey Ross, eating black-eyed peas on New Year's Day won't be enough to ensure good luck for 2007. "We always sprinkle a few black-eyed peas in the bottoms of our purses," said Ross, who lives in Martinsburg, W.Va. "You carry them around all year for good luck. Just two or three peas, uncooked. " Many cultures have their good luck food rituals for New Year's - whether it's black-eyed peas, a tradition with Southern roots, or eating a heaping dish of pork and sauerkraut, a tradition popular among many Pennsylvanians.
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