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Featured Articles from Herald-Mail

News | by DON AINES | April 25, 2006
CHAMBERSBURG, PA. A former Zullinger, Pa., man convicted of third-degree murder in the 2004 death of his infant son has been sentenced in Franklin County Court to seven to 20 years in state prison. Shane Michael Barrett, 25, formerly of 5261 Buchanan Trail East, was sentenced Friday by Judge Douglas W. Herman for the Nov. 18, 2004, death of 3-month-old Kaden Michael Barrett, Assistant District Attorney Angela Krom said. Barrett, who originally was charged with criminal homicide, aggravated assault and endangering the welfare of a child, entered the plea March 17, according to court records.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | February 15, 2011
Del. Neil C. Parrott, R-Washington, is trying to make it a civil violation, not a crime, to abandon a refrigerator in Maryland. Violators no longer would face up to 30 days in jail. But the maximum fine would increase from $100 to $5,000 under a bill Parrott filed. Parrott said it was ridiculous that Maryland makes improper disposal of a refrigerator a misdemeanor. He said some state laws are outdated and need to be changed. Maryland's Criminal Law says a person can't abandon or discard a refrigerator, icebox or freezer cabinet outside a building "in a place accessible to children," "uncrated" and with "a door or a lock that cannot be released for opening from the inside.
NEWS
May 14, 2001
Body found in Antietam Creek By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI AND TARA REILLY Police are investigating the death of an unidentified man whose body was found by children fishing near Antietam Creek bridge at Eastern Boulevard and Mount Aetna Road early Sunday afternoon, Hagerstown City Police said. continued The children found the man lying on his side in a few inches of water on top of the dam near the old city Light Plant, said Hagerstown City Police Chief Arthur Smith.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | January 8, 2013
It's winter. Time to try new ideas for getting vegetables in your children. I know what parents go through to get kids to eat vegetables. I was a kid once, and I hated finding vegetables I didn't like hidden in my food. I love pizza, but if a pizza had onions visible on it, I didn't eat it. If beef stew had green beans or peas in it, I plucked them out. Mushrooms in my soup? No way. Now I'm older and my tastes have matured, and I find many vegetables delicious. Still, there are times when I don't have time to chop veggies for a big salad or cook up a soup or stew.
NEWS
By KAUSTUV BASU | kaustuv.basu@herald-mail.com | May 26, 2013
Maryland's new gun law is set to take effect in October, and gun owners and gun-store employees are scrambling to figure out what the 62-page bill will mean to them. Tim Hafer, a manager at the Downsville Gun Shop and owner of Hafer's Gunsmithing, said the bill is confusing. The bill is written for “lawyers and judges,” he said. “A regular person will not be able to decipher it ... there are questions about everything ... what they will be able to buy and what they won't,” Hafer said.
NEWS
by MATTHEW UMSTEAD | March 13, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - Describing the murder of 14-year-old Miana Stewart as the most troubling and saddest case he has seen in all of his years on the bench, 23rd Judicial Circuit judge David H. Sanders on Monday added 80 years to Roger Dwayne Smith's life sentence in prison for the Gerrardstown, W.Va., girl's death in October 2005. "This case strikes at all the fundamental suppositions that we have," said Sanders, who offered Smith no reprieve on his 26th birthday. In December, Smith entered guilty pleas to possession of stolen vehicle, attempted murder, malicious wounding, fleeing on foot from an officer, first-degree robbery and first-degree murder.
NEWS
August 23, 2004
The Minnesota Branch of the American Association for Laboratory Animal Science Inc. offers pros and cons for many popular classroom pets. Mice: Active, lively, entertaining - but odoriferous, not easy to handle, short life span. Rats: Intelligent, friendly, trainable - but short life span with health problems at the end. Hamsters: Cute and appealing - but nocturnal and bad-tempered. Gerbils: Good-natured and healthy - but nocturnal and tough for children to handle.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | April 5, 2005
charlestown@herald-mail.com SHEPHERDSTOWN, W.Va. - The Yellow Brick Bank Restaurant, a popular local attraction that helped show people that Shepherdstown is a "snappy little place," has been sold. Kevin Connell, who transformed the old bank building at the corner of German and Princess streets into a restaurant in 1976, sold the business to local businessman Ken Lowe on Thursday, Connell said. Connell said he and Lowe closed on the deal Thursday and Lowe took over Friday.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | March 28, 2013
A Court of Common Pleas judge shifted roles and took the witness stand Thursday as a man convicted of first-degree murder continued his quest for a new trial. Judge Angela Krom, who was subpoenaed, testified about her previous role as an assistant district attorney. She worked on Ronald Harshman's July 2001 homicide trial with the county's former district attorney. Harshman was convicted in the presumed death of Greencastle, Pa., resident Melvin Elwood Snyder, whose body was never found.
NEWS
by CANDICE BOSELY | October 1, 2004
martinsburg@herald-mail.com MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - As a clerk announced Thursday afternoon that a jury had found Nicole Kees guilty of first-degree murder, Kees shook her head, covered her face with her hands and began to sob. Moments later, after members of the jury were dismissed, Kees screamed, "I'm going to spend my life in prison because their son wanted to get high?" Although the verdict carries an automatic sentence of life in prison, jurors decided to grant mercy, meaning Kees will be eligible for a parole hearing after serving 15 years.
NEWS
by PEPPER BALLARD | February 18, 2007
TRI-STATE - Secrecy has made piecing together local Underground Railroad history a challenging task, but it's a labor that historian Thomas Gerhart has made his mission. "There's still a struggle for information," said Gerhart, whose Greencastle, Pa., home contains stacks of books and pamphlets on the subject. Prior to 1998, when President Clinton signed The National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Act, widespread information on the Underground Railroad was scant, Gerhart said.
NEWS
By ANGELICA ROBERTS | June 30, 2008
Editor's note: The following story about the former Fort Ritchie U.S. Army Base is one in an occasional series of stories about some of the treasures of Washington County's past. CASCADE - What was to become Fort Ritchie U.S. Army base in Cascade started out as the Buena Vista Ice Co., became a National Guard camp and then was taken over by the U.S. Army to train soldiers in military intelligence and psychological warfare during World War II. It wound up its military years as a command center for Site R, a government installation known locally as the Underground Pentagon, built under Raven Rock Mountain in neighboring Pennsylvania.
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