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Featured Articles from Herald-Mail

News | By ROXANN MILLER and roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | February 24, 2012
As the first African-American woman to achieve the rank of major general in the U.S. Army, Marcia M. Anderson helped inspire Letterkenny Army Depot employees Friday as they observed Black History Month. In a keynote speech focusing on “Black Women in American Culture and History,” the 30-year career soldier spoke of her personal philosophy for success. “It's not your ZIP code or your family history that determines where you end up in life so much as what's in your heart and what's in your brain,” Anderson told Letterkenny employees.
NEWS
May 21, 2007
Dennis Udo Smith, 34, and Machele Lynn Ryder, 24, both of Hagerstown. James Allen Sayler Jr., 25, and Amanda Kay Socks, 23, both of Hagerstown. Terry Mark Richardson, 38, and Gretchen Gehr Hill, 38, both of Clear Spring. Michael James Finn, 32, and Jennifer Lyn Pine, 28, both of Stillwater, Okla. John Thomas McGettigan, 40, and Charleen Weslynn Stephens, 42, both of Hagerstown. Grant Kenneth Rewega, 26, and Colleen Beth McCollum, 27, both of Damascus, Md. Michael Jason St. Clair, 32, and Barbara Diane Clingerman, 30, both of Hancock.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 15, 2013
A 34-year-old man fell to his death from High Rock in northeastern Washington County on Monday. Michael Paul Liller of Thurmont, Md., was determined to be dead by medics who descended 100 feet to where he landed, officials on the scene said. Liller jumped from the rock formation's peak to a metal grate used by hang gliders at about 4 p.m. He then jumped to another rock, lost his balance and fell, according to Washington County (Md.) Sheriff's Office Sgt. Daryl Sanders. About 12 people were at the popular lookout spot when the fall occurred, Sanders said.
NEWS
Chad Smith | July 20, 2012
If you've ever had a conversation with me, you'd learn quickly I am a fact freak. I've got a head full of little annoying facts that would probably only be good for an appearance on "Jeopardy. " So today, I'm going to share with you some of the completely random fitness facts that float around in my brain on a regular basis, so in turn you can relay them to your friends at completely random times. It will make you sound brilliant, and you might actually get to meet my favorite Canadian, Alex Trebek.
NEWS
by KATE S. ALEXANDER | September 17, 2006
MERCERSBURG, PA. - Organizers of the 20th annual Two Top Ruritan Steam and Gas Show say the three-day event is about working for the community. In the words of Two Top Ruritan Club President Ralph Daugherty, the club's 23 members "work hard for free to make money, then give it away to the needy in the community. " Like most Ruritan clubs, the Two Top charter is a fundraising organization. The annual Steam and Gas show is the highlight for the small club, but Daugherty admitted he could not recall how much the club raised with the event last year.
NEWS
April 21, 2010
Compact fluorescent light bulbs Pros Uses less energy than incandescent bulbs, reducing demand for electricity and amount of mercury emitted from power plants. An Energy Star-qualified CFL bulb will use 75 percent less energy than an incandescent bulb. An Energy Star-qualified CFL bulb will last about 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb. An Energy Star-qualified CFL bulb will pay for itself in about 6 months. Cons Disposal isn't convenient because bulbs contain mercury.
NEWS
Lynn Little | July 20, 2011
Eating ice cream to beat the summer heat is one of America's favorite pastimes.   Homemade ice cream can be a special treat, but it can also become a threat because of salmonellosis. While commercially manufactured ice cream is typically made with pasteurized eggs or egg products, recipes for homemade ice cream often use raw eggs in the base mixture. If your favorite ice cream recipe uses uncooked eggs, it is time to replace or revise it. Those raw eggs may contain salmonella bacteria that can cause foodborne illness.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | July 4, 2007
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - A former local police officer and administrator of a local Moose lodge was free on bond Tuesday after he was charged last week with 14 counts of embezzlement stemming from his work at the lodge, according to charging documents and an investigator in the case. Investigators allege that James Roy Flickinger, 55, of 226 E. Fifth Ave. in Ranson, W.Va., would prepare a check for a particular amount written on a lodge raffle account, West Virginia State Police Trooper H.D. Heil said in a criminal complaint filed in Jefferson County Magistrate Court.
NEWS
February 19, 2011
The following individuals were indicted by a grand jury seated this week in Berkeley County Circuit Court. An indictment merely reflects a grand jury's conclusion that the accused probably committed the crime or crimes in question. • Antonio Prophet, 34, incarcerated at Potomac Highlands Regional Jail, Augusta, W.Va., on two counts of first-degree murder and one count of first-degree arson. • Robert W. Orr, 29, P.O. Box 236, Inwood, W.Va., on one count of transferring stolen property.
NEWS
By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | crystal.schelle@herald-mail.com | July 23, 2012
Justin Warner would like to clear up one thing: He doesn't wear lipstick. For some reason, judges on “The Next Food Network Star” were nearly as obsessed with Warner's red mouth as they were about his food. Lately, the only thing that's been painted on Warner's lips has been a smile. On Sunday night, Warner was named “The Next Food Network Star,” catapulting his career from self-taught chef to standing alongside other “cheflebrities.” Warner, a Hagerstown native, is now based in Brooklyn, N.Y., where he runs his restaurant, Do or Dine.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | October 23, 2012
Washington County's newly revised animal control ordinance includes a leash law. The Washington County Board of Commissioners unanimously approved the ordinance on Tuesday, more than three months after holding a public hearing. The new ordinance also defines “excessive noise” by an animal. The leash law adds a new layer to the county's requirement that animals can't roam “at large.” The new version of the ordinance says “every Dog must, when off the property of its Owner, be restrained by a leash.” Even before the leash law, though, the county already required animals to be “under the immediate control, charge, or possession of the Owner or other responsible person capable of physically restraining the animal.” Before passing the new version, the county commissioners discussed finer points of the law and whether it could be improved further.
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