Advertisement

Featured Articles from Herald-Mail

News | by SCOTT BUTKI | April 1, 2004
scottb@herald-mail.com BOONSBORO - An anti-smoking public service announcement written by three local students was to begin airing on radio stations across Maryland on Wednesday but it had already convinced the parents of two of the students to quit smoking. The ad, titled "Going into Town," was written by Dana Mills, 15, Amanda Eisel, 16, and Jessica Grim, 15, all sophomores at Boonsboro High School. The ad script was a winner in a contest sponsored by Maryland - Smoking Stops Here and Maryland Teens Rejecting Abusive Smoking Habits, or TRASH.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 15, 2013
A 34-year-old man fell to his death from High Rock in northeastern Washington County on Monday. Michael Paul Liller of Thurmont, Md., was determined to be dead by medics who descended 100 feet to where he landed, officials on the scene said. Liller jumped from the rock formation's peak to a metal grate used by hang gliders at about 4 p.m. He then jumped to another rock, lost his balance and fell, according to Washington County (Md.) Sheriff's Office Sgt. Daryl Sanders. About 12 people were at the popular lookout spot when the fall occurred, Sanders said.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | andrews@herald-mail.com | October 23, 2012
Washington County's newly revised animal control ordinance includes a leash law. The Washington County Board of Commissioners unanimously approved the ordinance on Tuesday, more than three months after holding a public hearing. The new ordinance also defines “excessive noise” by an animal. The leash law adds a new layer to the county's requirement that animals can't roam “at large.” The new version of the ordinance says “every Dog must, when off the property of its Owner, be restrained by a leash.” Even before the leash law, though, the county already required animals to be “under the immediate control, charge, or possession of the Owner or other responsible person capable of physically restraining the animal.” Before passing the new version, the county commissioners discussed finer points of the law and whether it could be improved further.
NEWS
January 13, 2001
New Suns owner has passion for baseball By JULIE E. GREENE / Staff Writer Just call Andrew Rayburn a sports junkie. Taking into account pro baseball, basketball, football and ice hockey, he estimates he attends about 100 games a year. He had a basketball court, a 60-yard football field and a baseball diamond built at the 90-acre headquarters campus for the family company he sold almost two years ago. He gave the company's 365 employees tickets so they could take their families to pro games.
LIFESTYLE
BY TIFFANY ARNOLD | tiffanya@herald-mail.com | February 9, 2011
Editor's note: This is the second in a monthly series about neighborhood grocery stores. In an era of the super-size supermarkets, Gordon Grocery is an anachronism. For starters, Gordon Grocery, known colloquially to patrons as Gordon's, looks like a general store in the middle of a residential block in Hagerstown's posh North End. Inside, the store is in a room wide enough to accommodate two aisles of dry and packaged goods, wine and beer, and a deli. The cashier's counter is at the store's front, middle seam.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | February 28, 2011
Accolades streamed in Monday for Frank Buckles, America’s last surviving World War I veteran, who died shortly after midnight Sunday. He was 110. Several area residents who knew or befriended Buckles offered remembrances.   There was no word at press time Monday whether a resolution sponsored by 13 U.S. senators passed the Senate to allow Buckles’ body to lie in state in the Rotunda in the U.S. Capitol. According to the resolution, the ceremony would serve “as a tribute and recognition of all United States military members who served in the First World War.” The leading condolence honoring Buckles and remembering his surviving daughter, Susannah Buckles Flanagan, came from President Obama.
NEWS
By JEFF RUGG / Creators Syndicate | April 11, 2009
Q: We moved into this home a couple of years ago, and it had several flowering vines growing on a variety of trellises. Some are falling apart and need to be replaced. I would like to cut some of the vines down, rebuild the trellises and let them grow back. I am afraid the vines will die or, if they survive, will not climb up the trellis. Is it OK to do this now, while they are dormant? How do I attach them to the trellis? A: Climbing vines want to go up. There are several methods that they use to attach themselves to vertical objects.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | August 5, 2012
The last Civil War soldier to witness the fighting at Burnside Bridge during the Battle of Antietam died nearly a century ago. But a 170-year-old eastern sycamore tree that abuts the north end of the stone bridge continues to thrive. Joe Calzarette, natural resources manager at Antietam National Battlefield, said the tree undoubtedly was hit by gunfire as thousands of Union and Confederate soldiers fought for control of the bridge on Sept. 17, 1862. “Boy, if it could talk,” Calzarette said of the tree, known as a witness tree because it was there at the time of the battle.
Advertisement
The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|