Advertisement

Featured Articles from Herald-Mail

News | By CRYSTAL SCHELLE | May 6, 2009
When I was a teen working at a Clear Spring deli, a man walked up to my counter and ordered a meat grinder. I looked back at the meat slicer behind me and told him that I couldn't sell it to him. He'd have to talk to my boss. That summer I found out (after an eye roll and a few choice words) that grinders are what New Englanders call subs. They're also called submarines, hoagies, heroes and Po'Boys, depending on where you grew up. A Western Maryland favorite, the steamer, also has its own identity crisis.
NEWS
By KATE S. ALEXANDER | kate.alexander@herald-mail.com | July 20, 2011
As a dome of sweltering heat, dense humidity and bright sunlight pushes eastward, experts are urging everyone, not just those at high risk, to take precautions. "When you get all three together - heat, humidity and sun - it makes the trifecta, and it really increases your chances of getting ill," according to Stacey Talbert, a registered nurse at Meritus Medical Center emergency department. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene activated its heat emergency plan this week, warning localities and residents to prepare.
NEWS
by TIFFANY ARNOLD | December 27, 2006
For Audrey Ross, eating black-eyed peas on New Year's Day won't be enough to ensure good luck for 2007. "We always sprinkle a few black-eyed peas in the bottoms of our purses," said Ross, who lives in Martinsburg, W.Va. "You carry them around all year for good luck. Just two or three peas, uncooked. " Many cultures have their good luck food rituals for New Year's - whether it's black-eyed peas, a tradition with Southern roots, or eating a heaping dish of pork and sauerkraut, a tradition popular among many Pennsylvanians.
NEWS
Lynn Little | July 20, 2011
Eating ice cream to beat the summer heat is one of America's favorite pastimes.   Homemade ice cream can be a special treat, but it can also become a threat because of salmonellosis. While commercially manufactured ice cream is typically made with pasteurized eggs or egg products, recipes for homemade ice cream often use raw eggs in the base mixture. If your favorite ice cream recipe uses uncooked eggs, it is time to replace or revise it. Those raw eggs may contain salmonella bacteria that can cause foodborne illness.
NEWS
November 14, 1996
11/14/96 By LAURA ERNDE Staff Writer CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A Newburg, Pa., man will stand trial Monday on charges he bludgeoned his neighbor to death with a rifle during a deer-hunting dispute last year, officials said. Norman Charles Round, 38, of 14336 West Creek Road, Lurgan Township, is charged with criminal homicide in the Nov. 30, 1995, death of George P. Roman, 49, of 5627 McClays Mill Road. Jury selection is set for Monday before Franklin County President Judge John Walker.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com | February 28, 2011
Accolades streamed in Monday for Frank Buckles, America’s last surviving World War I veteran, who died shortly after midnight Sunday. He was 110. Several area residents who knew or befriended Buckles offered remembrances.   There was no word at press time Monday whether a resolution sponsored by 13 U.S. senators passed the Senate to allow Buckles’ body to lie in state in the Rotunda in the U.S. Capitol. According to the resolution, the ceremony would serve “as a tribute and recognition of all United States military members who served in the First World War.” The leading condolence honoring Buckles and remembering his surviving daughter, Susannah Buckles Flanagan, came from President Obama.
NEWS
March 20, 2013
A man accused of sexually assaulting a girl in 2009 told authorities he was assaulted by another male inmate at Eastern Regional Jail early Tuesday, according to Berkeley County Magistrate Court records. The accused inmate, Aaron J. Stanback, 26, of Ronceverte, W.Va., was arraigned Tuesday on one count of first-degree sexual assault by Magistrate Charles C. Cole Sr., according to court documents. Police said Stanback indicated the encounter with John Paul Knipple Jr. was consensual and that he didn't mean to hurt him, according to court documents.
NEWS
BY DON AINES | April 28, 2005
chambersburg@herald-mail.com CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - A Chambersburg man convicted of participating in four convenience store robberies last year was sentenced Wednesday in Franklin County Court to five to 20 years in state prison. David Joseph Bitner, 23, of 4897 Guitner Road, pleaded guilty on Feb. 2 to four counts of criminal conspiracy to commit robbery. Judge John R. Walker fined Bitner $200 on each charge and ordered him to pay $3,975 in restitution. Assistant District Attorney T. R. Williams said Bitner was the driver in four armed robberies between July 24 and 29 at four convenience stores in Franklin and Cumberland counties.
NEWS
December 28, 1999
By RICHARD F. BELISLE / Staff Writer, Waynesboro photo: RIC DUGAN / staff photographer GREENCASTLE, Pa. - Truckers at the Travel Port truck stop in Greencastle showed little concern Tuesday over a Pennsylvania law that took effect last week making it illegal to stay in the left lane on major roads. The law forces drivers to use the lane "nearest the right-hand edge of the roadway," except to pass or to make a left turn - and then for only two miles before making the turn.
NEWS
By MATTHEW UMSTEAD | November 15, 2007
MARTINSBURG, W.VA. - A Berkeley County jury found Stephen R. Fielder guilty Wednesday of first-degree murder in the August 2006 death of his ex-wife, Debra Ann Fielder. The jury recommended no mercy for the 59-year-old Bunker Hill, W.Va., attorney, meaning he could spend life in prison without parole. A first-degree murder conviction automatically carries a state-mandated life sentence. The panel of eight men and four women reached its verdict after about 2 1/2 hours of deliberations that began Tuesday night.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | February 25, 2011
A Hagerstown soldier accused of killing an unarmed Afghan civilian last September was an exemplary leader who showed solid judgment and looked out for his men, an eyewitness to the incident told Army officials in military proceedings. Spc. Charles Miller testified during an Article 32 hearing, which is similar to a civilian grand jury, that Sgt. Derrick Miller, 27, was a "squared away" soldier who acted "reasonably in pressure situations. " "I wouldn't question his judgment if he believed the use of deadly force was necessary," Charles Miller said.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 28, 2013
Sandra Volneck has faced many challenges over the years, but the hardest thing she ever had to do was look at her 15-year-old daughter's battered, lifeless body before closing the casket and burying her. “I wouldn't wish that on nobody. I'll never get over it,” Volneck said last week. “Never.” Twenty-nine years later and recovering from surgery for lung cancer, Volneck still does not know who killed her only child. Maryland State Police recovered Lorraine “Lori” Zimmerman's body from a wooded area outside Boonsboro in April 1984.
Advertisement
The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|