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Featured Articles from Herald-Mail

News | by DAVE McMILLION | February 22, 2007
CHARLES TOWN, W.VA. - Jefferson County Sheriff's Department Cpl. Ronald Fletcher - who was shot twice Monday - was taken off a ventilator at Washington (D.C.) Hospital Center and was breathing on his own Wednesday, an administrative assistant at the sheriff's department said. "We were ecstatic about that," Evelyn Partlow, the administrative assistant, said. Fletcher was put on the ventilator after his lungs were damaged in the shooting in the Orchard Hills subdivision in Ranson, W.Va.
NEWS
By DON AINES | April 26, 2000
SHIPPENSBURG, Pa. - Students and faculty members at Shippensburg University reacted tearfully Wednesday to the news that a charred body found in a mountain fire early Tuesday was that of a marketing major who had been shot in the head. cont. from news page Sydney S. Bull, 23, a senior from Norristown, Pa., was slain and his body set on fire in the Michaux State Forest just outside Franklin County, Cumberland County Coroner Mike Norris said Wednesday. "We are posting a $10,000 reward for the arrest and conviction of the perpetrator or perpetrators of this crime," University President Anthony F. Ceddia told a group of more than 200 students, faculty and press at a noon meeting in the Old Main Chapel.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | February 3, 2011
The Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services has suspended programs that sends young people into prisons in an effort to scare them into not committing crimes. Rick Binetti, director of communications for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, said Maryland Commissioner of Correction J. Michael Stouffer imposed the directive last week to ensure that the proper procedures were being followed. The decision to suspend diversion programs was made last month shortly after A&E television entered the Maryland Correctional Institution south of Hagerstown to film a segment of "Beyond Scared Straight," a weekly series that airs Thursday at 10 p.m. on A&E. The program places troubled youth among the inmate population under the theory that the experience could deter them from breaking the law. An episode that aired Jan.  20 after being shot at the Maryland Correctional Institution near Jessup showed inmates touching some of the children.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 15, 2013
A 34-year-old man fell to his death from High Rock in northeastern Washington County on Monday. Michael Paul Liller of Thurmont, Md., was determined to be dead by medics who descended 100 feet to where he landed, officials on the scene said. Liller jumped from the rock formation's peak to a metal grate used by hang gliders at about 4 p.m. He then jumped to another rock, lost his balance and fell, according to Washington County (Md.) Sheriff's Office Sgt. Daryl Sanders. About 12 people were at the popular lookout spot when the fall occurred, Sanders said.
NEWS
BY Christine L. Moats | April 1, 2002
Q: What can I do to prepare for my first doctor's visit without one of my parents? A: To be prepared, do the following: Bring your medical records or have them transferred from your previous doctor's office. Bring your insurance card with you to your visit. Arrive early for your first visit as you will most likely have to fill out paperwork. If you haven't been feeling well, make a list of the symptoms you've been experiencing to share with your doctor. Write down any questions or concerns that you would like to discuss with the doctor.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | October 6, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- A Martinsburg physician charged with felony conspiracy to obtain illegal drugs was allowed to plead guilty Tuesday to a lesser charge of false pretense in a brief hearing before Berkeley County Magistrate Randy Smith. Dr. Robert William Phares, 39, of 53 Temptations Drive, was charged by Lt. Gary Harmison of the Berkeley County Sheriff's Department in May along with Tressie Monene Duffy, 39, of 808 Jerry Court, Martinsburg. Duffy, also a physician, faces felony charges of prescription fraud and conspiracy to commit prescription fraud in the case.
LIFESTYLE
By DEVON JACOBS and SUZANNAH WYATT | Pulse correspondents | February 7, 2011
Should it be an extra-special day or should you be treated special every day? Two Pulse correspondents took their sides. A special holiday Should Valentine’s Day be a day that your significant other treats you especially well, or should you normally be treated special every day? Indeed, Valentine’s Day is when your “other half” treats you out to a nice day or perhaps a special evening, but should that behavior be encouraged for every day of the year?
EDUCATION
By JANET HEIM | janeth@herald-mail.com | July 29, 2012
Aubrey Sparks isn't your typical teenager. She was 14 when she started as a student at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Va., and has just finished her third year there, majoring in philosophy and political science and minoring in peacemaking. She's a voting member of the private four-year women's liberal arts college's Student Senate, even though she won't be old enough to vote in this November's presidential election. Aubrey was going into her junior year of college before she was old enough to get her driver's license last summer.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION, Charles Town | June 4, 1999
CHARLES TOWN, W.Va. - For 30 years, no matter how noisy it got at Charles Town Races, Costy Caras' voice rose above the clamor. On Friday night, that memorable voice - known for its signature "Eet ees neoww POST time" - echoed for the last time across the thoroughbred track. Caras, who recently celebrated his 75th birthday, has decided to retire. "This day had to come sometime," said Caras, who added he does not have the "vim and vigor" he once had. As track announcer, Caras had the knack of memorizing the names of horses and the jockeys' silk colors in the post parade so he could accurately call a race.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | July 19, 2008
View the Monster Jam slideshow. WASHINGTON COUNTY - Loud, growling monster trucks wowed the crowd Friday at Hagerstown Speedway. Even the names of the trucks - El Toro Loco, Stone Crusher - were intimidating. The trucks ooze muscles and machismo. Each is about 11 feet high and 12 feet wide, weighs more than 9,000 pounds, and uses tires at least 66 inches high and 43 inches wide, according to a Monster Jam fact sheet. As the pumped-up trucks screamed around the dirt track, the PA announcer yelled with excitement and thousands of people in the stands, including many children, roared, adding to the din. Several fans said Friday that noise is part of the experience, but some, particularly parents, looked for ways to minimize it. Shaun Rose of Hagerstown bought two pairs of ear plugs from a vendor.
NEWS
By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com | February 24, 2012
As the first African-American woman to achieve the rank of major general in the U.S. Army, Marcia M. Anderson helped inspire Letterkenny Army Depot employees Friday as they observed Black History Month. In a keynote speech focusing on “Black Women in American Culture and History,” the 30-year career soldier spoke of her personal philosophy for success. “It's not your ZIP code or your family history that determines where you end up in life so much as what's in your heart and what's in your brain,” Anderson told Letterkenny employees.
NEWS
February 18, 2001
Obituaries for 2/19 Harry J. Everetts MCCONNELLSBURG, Pa. - Harry J. Everetts, 51, of Route 2, Strawberry Ridge, died Saturday, Feb. 17, 2001, at Fulton County Medical Center. Born Sept. 23, 1949, in Fulton County, Pa., he was the son of the late Harry J. Everetts Sr. and Betty M. Lynch Everetts. He was a 1968 graduate of James Buchanan High School, Mercersburg, Pa. He was employed for Guerdon's Industries and later at Letterkenny Army Depot. He served in the U.S. Army, serving in Vietnam with the 103rd Engineer Co. He was a member of James McKibbin American Legion Post 561, McConnellsburg; and N.R.A.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | January 14, 2012
Juvenile crime in the United States has followed a generally downward trend since the early 1990s, according to the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. From 2008 to 2009, juvenile arrests for violent crime fell 10 percent and overall arrests were down 9 percent, to the lowest rate in two decades, according to a report released by the Justice Department in December. "That's been the trend, not just in Maryland, but nationally," said Reginald Garnett, executive director for residential operations for the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services, which oversees juvenile detention and residential treatment facilities in the state.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | October 23, 2012
The rest stop off Interstate 70 near Myersville, Md., has been renovated since two of this century's most notorious serial killers were captured there 10 years ago Wednesday. Retired Maryland State Trooper 1st Class D. Wayne Smith said the parking area is bigger and larger buildings have been constructed to replace the former welcome center. Despite the changes, Smith said he remembers where the Chevrolet Caprice with New Jersey tags was parked. The car was used by Beltway snipers John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo, whose shooting spree terrorized the Washington, D.C., area for 21 days in 2002.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | April 2, 1999
In April 1984, Sandra Volneck's 15-year-old daughter Lori Zimmerman disappeared, turning up as the victim of a brutal murder a few days later. "I think of her and carry her picture with me every day," Volneck said. "She would have been 30 now if she'd lived. " "Lori never hurt anybody," Volneck said. "She had a lot of living to do and she didn't get to do that. " Fifteen years after the crime, Maryland State Police in Hagerstown have reopened the case, reviewing the evidence in hopes of finally bringing Lori's killer to justice.
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