Advertisement

Featured Articles from Herald-Mail

News | by JULIE E. GREENE | August 24, 2005
julieg@herald-mail.com Red, yellow, orange or pink? Heirloom or hybrid? Does the skin color or breeding of a tomato really indicate whether it's less acidic and does it matter? It's generally assumed that orange or yellow tomatoes are going to be lower in acid than red tomatoes, but that's not necessarily true, says Jon Traunfeld, regional specialist in fruits and vegetables with the Maryland Cooperative Extension's Home and Garden Information Center in Ellicott City, Md. Some yellow varieties are high-acid and some red are low, local experts say. For example, Jetstar, a red tomato, is low-acid, says Steve Bogash, regional horticulture educator for Penn State Cooperative Extension in Franklin County, Pa. Seed catalogs usually note whether a tomato cultivar or variety is low-acid, but people shopping locally for low-acid tomatoes might be pressed to find somebody at a produce stand who knows for a fact whether their tomato is low-acid, Bogash says.
NEWS
by ANDREA ROWLAND | October 7, 2003
andrear@herald-mail.com Be real. That's the best advice for winning a school election. It worked for Adam Hockensmith, who won his run for president of the Student Government Association at South Hagerstown High School this year. Adam narrowly beat fellow senior Trang Phan for the position - and he did it by being sincere, upbeat, funny and confident, he says. "I just tried to be myself, to be positive, and not to have a fake niceness about me," says Adam, 16, of Hagerstown.
NEWS
Lynn Little | July 20, 2011
Eating ice cream to beat the summer heat is one of America's favorite pastimes.   Homemade ice cream can be a special treat, but it can also become a threat because of salmonellosis. While commercially manufactured ice cream is typically made with pasteurized eggs or egg products, recipes for homemade ice cream often use raw eggs in the base mixture. If your favorite ice cream recipe uses uncooked eggs, it is time to replace or revise it. Those raw eggs may contain salmonella bacteria that can cause foodborne illness.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | August 5, 2012
The last Civil War soldier to witness the fighting at Burnside Bridge during the Battle of Antietam died nearly a century ago. But a 170-year-old eastern sycamore tree that abuts the north end of the stone bridge continues to thrive. Joe Calzarette, natural resources manager at Antietam National Battlefield, said the tree undoubtedly was hit by gunfire as thousands of Union and Confederate soldiers fought for control of the bridge on Sept. 17, 1862. “Boy, if it could talk,” Calzarette said of the tree, known as a witness tree because it was there at the time of the battle.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 15, 2013
A 34-year-old man fell to his death from High Rock in northeastern Washington County on Monday. Michael Paul Liller of Thurmont, Md., was determined to be dead by medics who descended 100 feet to where he landed, officials on the scene said. Liller jumped from the rock formation's peak to a metal grate used by hang gliders at about 4 p.m. He then jumped to another rock, lost his balance and fell, according to Washington County (Md.) Sheriff's Office Sgt. Daryl Sanders. About 12 people were at the popular lookout spot when the fall occurred, Sanders said.
NEWS
by DAVE McMILLION | June 23, 2003
charlestown@herald-mail.com HARPERS FERRY, W.Va. - A busy campground along U.S. 340 became the scene of a shooting Sunday afternoon, prompting two off-duty police officers to subdue the suspect, police said. The victim, Mihailo Zuber, of Rockville, Md., was shot in the foot with a 12-gauge shotgun, according to Sgt. Sam Harmon of the Jefferson County Sheriff's Department. Luther G. Daniel, 47, of P.O. Box 187, Martinsburg, W.Va., was charged with malicious wounding, wanton endangerment and brandishing, Harmon said.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | September 12, 2009
Editor's note: Each Sunday, The Herald-Mail publishes "A Life Remembered. " This continuing series takes a look back -- through the eyes of family, friends, co-workers and others -- at a member of the community who died recently. Today's "A Life Remembered" is about Alan Aubrey Marriner, who died Aug. 31 at the age of 89. His obituary was published in the Sept. 2 edition of The Herald-Mail. Alan Aubrey Marriner would have been the first to describe himself as a thinker. Right up to the end of his life, he was learning new languages and reading everything he could get his hands on. But the life Alan lived bore out that he also was very much a doer -- both in his community and where his family was concerned.
NEWS
by JASON STEIN/Wheelbase Communications | March 30, 2004
It is fitting, perhaps, that George Rice "Joie" Chitwood would be remembered as the first driver to have ever snapped a seat belt together during a trip around the famed Indianapolis 500 Speedway. A seat belt and Joie Chitwood? For anyone who knows about Chitwood - the wild adventures, the hurtling machinery and the thrill show chills - it almost doesn't add up. "But, if you knew my grandfather, you knew he was always ahead of his time," said Joie Chitwood III, his hands firmly on the wheel of a Chevrolet Corvette pace car as it wound its way around the Indianapolis track during a pre-Indy 500 media event.
NEWS
by ARV VOSS/Motor Matters | July 15, 2005
Harley-Davidson has commemorated anniversaries before with special edition models, but I don't recall in recent history a specific model that celebrated its own anniversary. The Motor Company alters that history with the FLSTFI Fat Boy 15th Anniversary edition bike. Harley produced a limited number of Screamin' Eagle Fat Boys for the 2005 model year, but the 15th anniversary bike isn't a product of the Custom Vehicle Operation Screamin' Eagle lineup. Despite that fact, the 15th Anniversary Fat Boy is a limited edition bike that comes stock with a motor that's a full 100cc bigger - 1550cc to be exact.
LIFESTYLE
By CHRIS COPLEY | chrisc@herald-mail.com | July 10, 2012
Editor's note: This is part of an occasional series on children eating vegetables. The series explores ways to highlight a vegetable's flavor and appearance as a way to work around the resistance some picky eaters have to trying unfamiliar vegetables. I am OK with radishes. Really, I am. They have a peppery bite, a bright color and a pleasant crunch. But I've never really taken them seriously on their own. They always seemed like a side show - a garnish - to a salad or some other important dish.
NEWS
May 21, 2010
-MAY 12, 2010 ST. LOUIS, Mo. - Ian Archer Navarro (Mendez), 44, died of metastatic cancer on Wednesday, May 12, 2010, in St. Louis, Mo. Ian had recently moved to St. Louis, Mo., with his partner, Paul Huber. They previously resided in Pittsburgh, Pa., Hollywood, Fla., and Tulsa, Okla., for several years, where Ian managed their real estate holdings and a small art gallery. Ian was a 1983 graduate of Boonsboro High School in Boonsboro, Md., and was a well-known and much-loved entrepreneur in the Frederick, Md., area.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | April 18, 2012
A Shippensburg, Pa., woman was sentenced Wednesday in Franklin County Court to six to 23 months in the county jail for her role in the death of a 10-month-old boy who sustained fatal head injuries at the hands of another child while in her care. Dottie Mae Bowers, 57, of 127 Benelton Drive, pleaded no contest in February to a first-degree misdemeanor charge of endangering the welfare of a child. Judge Carol Van Horn made Bowers eligible for early release, but ordered her to spend three years on probation following her release from jail.
NEWS
May 15, 2001
Man found dead in creek is identified By KIMBERLY YAKOWSKI kimy@herald-mail.com Hagerstown City Police said Monday they had identified the body of a man found lying in Antietam Creek a day earlier, but still don't know how he came to be in the water. Police Chief Arthur Smith said the body had been identified as that of David George Grams, 33, of no fixed address by checking his fingerprints on a police computer. "It looks to me like he drowned," Medical Examiner Dr. Edward Ditto III, said.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | April 10, 2003
gregs@herald-mail.com The wife of a man who died in 2001 after fencing materials fell on him has filed a $1.5 million lawsuit against the planing mill where the man was fatally injured. Max A. Fogle, who was 51, had gone to the Hicksville Planing Mill at 14464 Hicksville Road near Clear Spring early on July 3, 2001, to pick up several wooden fence sections, according to police accounts at the time. As Fogle, who lived in Hagerstown, was loading the fence sections into a truck, eight pieces that had been leaning against a wall fell on him, police said.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | October 23, 2012
The rest stop off Interstate 70 near Myersville, Md., has been renovated since two of this century's most notorious serial killers were captured there 10 years ago Wednesday. Retired Maryland State Trooper 1st Class D. Wayne Smith said the parking area is bigger and larger buildings have been constructed to replace the former welcome center. Despite the changes, Smith said he remembers where the Chevrolet Caprice with New Jersey tags was parked. The car was used by Beltway snipers John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo, whose shooting spree terrorized the Washington, D.C., area for 21 days in 2002.
Advertisement
The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|