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News | By JENNIFER FITCH and waynesboro@herald-mail.com | June 3, 2012
A fight filmed on the steps of the historic Berkeley County Courthouse played out on televisions across the country Sunday night as part of TLC's “My Big Fat American Gypsy Wedding.” Two young Romanichal gypsy women shoved and punched each other following a wedding in the reality series that depicts the everyday lives of families like Mellie Stanley's. She was charged with disorderly conduct after the brawl. Cameras caught Mellie and the maid of honor, Diamond, in what Mellie called “a huge argument.” It centered around comments allegedly made about the bride's mother-in-law.
NEWS
By RICHARD F. BELISLE | October 6, 2009
MARTINSBURG, W.Va. -- A Martinsburg physician charged with felony conspiracy to obtain illegal drugs was allowed to plead guilty Tuesday to a lesser charge of false pretense in a brief hearing before Berkeley County Magistrate Randy Smith. Dr. Robert William Phares, 39, of 53 Temptations Drive, was charged by Lt. Gary Harmison of the Berkeley County Sheriff's Department in May along with Tressie Monene Duffy, 39, of 808 Jerry Court, Martinsburg. Duffy, also a physician, faces felony charges of prescription fraud and conspiracy to commit prescription fraud in the case.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | April 15, 2013
A 34-year-old man fell to his death from High Rock in northeastern Washington County on Monday. Michael Paul Liller of Thurmont, Md., was determined to be dead by medics who descended 100 feet to where he landed, officials on the scene said. Liller jumped from the rock formation's peak to a metal grate used by hang gliders at about 4 p.m. He then jumped to another rock, lost his balance and fell, according to Washington County (Md.) Sheriff's Office Sgt. Daryl Sanders. About 12 people were at the popular lookout spot when the fall occurred, Sanders said.
NEWS
by RICHARD BELISLE | December 16, 2002
waynesboro@herald-mail.com HAGERSTOWN - A shooting early Saturday morning on Jonathan Street left a New Jersey man dead and police searching for a suspect who was seen fleeing on foot, Hagerstown Police said. The victim was identified as Anthony Wallace, 28, of 120 Monmouth Ave., Building D, Apt. #2, Asbury Park, N.J. An autopsy performed Saturday by the state Medical Examiner's Office in Baltimore confirmed Wallace died from multiple gunshot wounds. Police received a call at 3:38 a.m. reporting shots had been fired on Jonathan Street near the intersection with Charles Street.
NEWS
March 25, 2009
MARCH 2, 1929-MARCH 23, 2009 Charles G. King, 80, of Hagerstown, Md., passed away Monday, March 23, 2009, at Washington County Hospital, Hagerstown. Born Saturday, March 2, 1929, in Bristol, Tenn., he was the son of the late Carl Farmer and the late Gertrude King Farmer. Charles graduated from Baltimore Polytechnic High school and attended Catonsville Community College. He served in the Navy during the Korean War. He was employed with Canteen in Baltimore, Md., starting in 1954.
NEWS
By ARNOLD S. PLATOU | arnoldp@herald-mail.com | June 2, 2013
Wendy Kidd was working inside a client's home, cleaning the master bathroom when, suddenly, she heard a noise in the bedroom. Peeking around a corner, Kidd gasped when she saw a man - the husband in the family that owned the house - beginning to undress. “I said, 'What are you doing?!!'” Kidd remembers screaming. As it turned out, the man hadn't known she was there, and he was just changing his clothes. “I don't know who was more embarrassed - him or I,” Kidd said.
NEWS
By MARLO BARNHART | September 12, 2009
Editor's note: Each Sunday, The Herald-Mail publishes "A Life Remembered. " This continuing series takes a look back -- through the eyes of family, friends, co-workers and others -- at a member of the community who died recently. Today's "A Life Remembered" is about Alan Aubrey Marriner, who died Aug. 31 at the age of 89. His obituary was published in the Sept. 2 edition of The Herald-Mail. Alan Aubrey Marriner would have been the first to describe himself as a thinker. Right up to the end of his life, he was learning new languages and reading everything he could get his hands on. But the life Alan lived bore out that he also was very much a doer -- both in his community and where his family was concerned.
NEWS
by JASON STEIN / Wheelbase Communications | July 16, 2006
Sometimes, she says, when times are tough and she's feeling lonely, she still cries. It might last 10 seconds. It might last longer. But deep down, Teresa Earnhardt, auto racing's most famous widow and one of NASCAR's most influential team owners, knows that the pain will never go away. "I hate it," Teresa Earnhardt once told NBC's Dateline news program. "I hate it so bad, feeling bad, that I just turn it off. I miss him and I always will. Just terribly. But I'm not going to feel bad about it. I'm going to feel glad about what I had. " What she had was, in a word, everything.
NEWS
By LARRY YANOS | February 12, 2006
The Rooney family, which happens to own a professional football team in Pittsburgh, once ran horses at Charles Town Races and Slots. Over the years, there have been many Rooney-owned horses compete at the West Virginia thoroughbred oval. The best of the lot was Christopher R. Art Rooney, the late owner of the Pittsburgh Steelers, saw his horse win by the largest margin in the history of the Tri-State Futurity. Christopher R. won in 1973 by 12 lengths for trainer "Tuffy" Hacker and jockey William J. Passmore - now a state steward in Maryland.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | dan.dearth@herald-mail.com | April 12, 2012
An 18-year-old Smithsburg High School senior has succumbed to injuries he suffered in an accident while working for the Hagerstown Suns at Municipal Stadium on Tuesday. Mitchell Ronald Akers, of 109 Rachels Court in Smithsburg, died Wednesday night, according to Smithsburg High and Suns officials. Smithsburg High Athletic Director Teresa Bachtell said school officials read a statement to students Thursday morning informing them that Akers had died Wednesday night. She said grief counselors were called to the school to help students deal with the tragedy.
NEWS
by JULIE E. GREENE | August 24, 2005
julieg@herald-mail.com Red, yellow, orange or pink? Heirloom or hybrid? Does the skin color or breeding of a tomato really indicate whether it's less acidic and does it matter? It's generally assumed that orange or yellow tomatoes are going to be lower in acid than red tomatoes, but that's not necessarily true, says Jon Traunfeld, regional specialist in fruits and vegetables with the Maryland Cooperative Extension's Home and Garden Information Center in Ellicott City, Md. Some yellow varieties are high-acid and some red are low, local experts say. For example, Jetstar, a red tomato, is low-acid, says Steve Bogash, regional horticulture educator for Penn State Cooperative Extension in Franklin County, Pa. Seed catalogs usually note whether a tomato cultivar or variety is low-acid, but people shopping locally for low-acid tomatoes might be pressed to find somebody at a produce stand who knows for a fact whether their tomato is low-acid, Bogash says.
NEWS
By BRUCE HAMILTON | July 9, 1999
The longtime leader of a state Ku Klux Klan faction resigned and ended his membership Friday, saying he may seek the governor's office. Roger Kelly, Imperial Wizard of the Invincible Empire, left the organization to focus on his family and pursue politics. The Rocky Ridge, Md., resident said a Hancock resident will replace him until a November election. He declined to reveal the new wizard's name. Kelly is not new to politics or publicity. In 1990, he ran unsuccessfully for Frederick County Commissioner and joined the local branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
NEWS
By ANDREW SCHOTZ | July 19, 2008
View the Monster Jam slideshow. WASHINGTON COUNTY - Loud, growling monster trucks wowed the crowd Friday at Hagerstown Speedway. Even the names of the trucks - El Toro Loco, Stone Crusher - were intimidating. The trucks ooze muscles and machismo. Each is about 11 feet high and 12 feet wide, weighs more than 9,000 pounds, and uses tires at least 66 inches high and 43 inches wide, according to a Monster Jam fact sheet. As the pumped-up trucks screamed around the dirt track, the PA announcer yelled with excitement and thousands of people in the stands, including many children, roared, adding to the din. Several fans said Friday that noise is part of the experience, but some, particularly parents, looked for ways to minimize it. Shaun Rose of Hagerstown bought two pairs of ear plugs from a vendor.
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