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Featured Articles from Herald-Mail

News | May 27, 1997
By KERRY LYNN FRALEY Staff Writer Gazing out the window of her classroom at St. Mary's School, Sister Mary Corda Mullenix sees basically the same view she did as a high school senior in homeroom in the 1940s. It's interesting that she ended up teaching sixth- and seventh-grade English and literature in the same room, remodeled since St. Maria Goretti High School took the high school grades in 1958, said Sister Corda, 70. It's also fitting, because her path in life was strongly influenced by the Catholic nuns who taught her at the school, said the Hagerstown native, in her 10th year of teaching at her alma mater.
NEWS
by GREGORY T. SIMMONS | April 10, 2003
gregs@herald-mail.com The wife of a man who died in 2001 after fencing materials fell on him has filed a $1.5 million lawsuit against the planing mill where the man was fatally injured. Max A. Fogle, who was 51, had gone to the Hicksville Planing Mill at 14464 Hicksville Road near Clear Spring early on July 3, 2001, to pick up several wooden fence sections, according to police accounts at the time. As Fogle, who lived in Hagerstown, was loading the fence sections into a truck, eight pieces that had been leaning against a wall fell on him, police said.
NEWS
January 18, 2001
Man guilty of having sex with 12-year-old By MARLO BARNHART / Staff Writer A New Mexico man who admitted having sex with a 12-year-old Hagerstown girl he met at a Florida baseball game was sentenced Thursday to 18 months in the Washington County Detention Center. Robert Martin Godwin, 42, of Sante Fe, N.M., pleaded guilty to one count of third-degree sex offense before Washington County Circuit Judge Frederick Wright. On July 20, Washington County Sheriff's Deputy Ken Cain responded to Washington County Hospital where Hagerstown City Police were with the victim, who told them of the sexual encounters at the Econo Lodge near State Line, Pa. The girl, now 13, told Cain and Investigator Kenny Barnhart she met Godwin at a baseball game in Florida on March 13 and that they remained in contact by telephone after she returned home to Hagerstown, court records said.
NEWS
By ANGELICA ROBERTS | June 30, 2008
Editor's note: The following story about the former Fort Ritchie U.S. Army Base is one in an occasional series of stories about some of the treasures of Washington County's past. CASCADE - What was to become Fort Ritchie U.S. Army base in Cascade started out as the Buena Vista Ice Co., became a National Guard camp and then was taken over by the U.S. Army to train soldiers in military intelligence and psychological warfare during World War II. It wound up its military years as a command center for Site R, a government installation known locally as the Underground Pentagon, built under Raven Rock Mountain in neighboring Pennsylvania.
NEWS
BY Christine L. Moats | April 1, 2002
Q: What can I do to prepare for my first doctor's visit without one of my parents? A: To be prepared, do the following: Bring your medical records or have them transferred from your previous doctor's office. Bring your insurance card with you to your visit. Arrive early for your first visit as you will most likely have to fill out paperwork. If you haven't been feeling well, make a list of the symptoms you've been experiencing to share with your doctor. Write down any questions or concerns that you would like to discuss with the doctor.
NEWS
December 28, 2001
Sellers' trial delayed until March in Franklin County By STACEY DANZUSO chbbureau@innernet.net CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. - The trial of Sally A. Sellers, one of two women charged in the murder of a veteran's post commander during a botched robbery attempt last year, has been postponed to March due to the court's schedule. Sellers was listed for the January trial term, but there was no free week in the court schedule to accommodate the trial, Assistant District Attorney T.R. Williams said.
NEWS
By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com | September 6, 2012
A Maugansville man who testified 11 years ago that Ronald Harshman told him where he dumped a body claimed in court Thursday that he lied. “You've never spoken to (Harshman) in your life?” an attorney asked. “No, I haven't,” Keith Granlun said. As Harshman's attorney seeks a new trial, he is trying to demonstrate witnesses perjured themselves in July 2001 in exchange for special consideration from the Franklin County (Pa.) District Attorney's office. Harshman was convicted of first-degree murder in the presumed death of Melvin Elwood Snyder, whose body was never found.
NEWS
By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com | October 11, 2011
A cab ride from Waynesboro, Pa., to Hagerstown. Sounds simple enough, but cabbie Kathy Rhodes said instead she found herself in the middle of a harrowing ordeal a week ago when she watched her rider get out of the cab, allegedly force his way into a house on Reiff Church Road and hit someone inside. The man then jumped back into the cab as she tried to drive away. But Rhodes - with the help of a Washington County 911 dispatcher on her cellphone - hatched a plan to go to a nearby McDonald's restaurant, where police were able to capture the man after a struggle.
NEWS
By DAN DEARTH | August 13, 2009
HAGERSTOWN -- The father of a 9-year-old boy with cystic fibrosis has won a months-long quest to have Washington County Public Schools officials allow his son to attend a smaller school. Jamie Griffith of Hagerstown said last week that he believed school officials would be jeopardizing the health of his son Breece if they continued to refuse to let the youngster transfer from Bester Elementary to the nearby Emma K. Doub School for Integrated Arts and Technology. Griffith said his son's cystic fibrosis increases the chances of Breece getting seriously ill. A larger school with more students means more germs, creating a greater risk of illness, he said.
NEWS
By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com | September 9, 2011
"Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it. " - George Santayana History never actually repeats itself, as each incident is unique, but events like the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks set the table for decisions and actions that can be examined a decade later to learn what did and did not work. "We learned that our traditional defense of 3,000-plus miles of ocean is no longer a barrier," Thomas G. Clemens, a professor of history at Hagerstown Community College, wrote in an email.
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