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Museum hosts reception, awards ceremony for Cumberland Valley Artists Exhibition

September 09, 2013|By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com
  • "Lightsaber," an oil on canvas painting by Philip Lindsey of Chambersburg, Pa., greets those who enter the 81st annual Cumberland Valley Artists Exhibition at the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts.
By Joe Crocetta / Staff Photographer

The red Dodge Dart is still in Roy Steele’s acrylic painting, but the spectators — in the painting and at the art exhibit — know it’s got some speed because of the pillows of white smoke coming out of the muscle car’s exhaust pipe as it races down a dragway strip.

Steele, 51, of Hagerstown, said he named the large canvas work “The Sleeper” because the Dodge’s speed is a surprise.

For the painting, Steele picked up the Washington County Arts Council’s award Sunday at the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts in Hagerstown’s City Park.

The museum hosted the opening reception and awards ceremony for the 81st annual Cumberland Valley Artists Exhibition.

Best in show went to Brad Clever of Chambersburg, Pa., for his “Milk Glass and Peppers,” an oil still life on wood panel.

Jennifer Chapman Smith, the museum’s collections and exhibitions manager, said juror Ephraim Rubenstein selected 65 works out of 314 entries for the exhibit.

The exhibit was sponsored by Bob and Mary Helen Strauch, and Hugh and Marty Talton, according to the exhibit brochure.

The exhibit will be on display through Nov. 3, Smith said.

Lee W. Badger of Hedgesville, W.Va., won the Maryland Metals Award for “Waldgeist II.” The piece appears to be a delicate mask, which, according to the exhibit brochure, Badger created by forging and welding weathering steel.

Lee Weaver, a former supervisor of fine arts for Washington County Public Schools, received the Clyde H. Roberts Award for his transparent watercolor, “Roulette Barn.”

Weaver, of Sharpsburg, said he was doubly honored Sunday — not only for his painting earning an award but for being the recipient of the award named after his late friend, Clyde Roberts.

Todd Groesbeck didn’t receive an award Sunday, but his oil on linen of “Lola” had several admirers, including Lola and her mother.

The curly-haired Lola is the 6-year-old daughter of a friend, said Groesbeck, 57, of Hagerstown.

Lola Aguilar of the Charles Town, W.Va., area, said it was “amazing” to see her portrait hung on the museum wall.

Her mother, Andrea Aguilar, said Sunday was the first time she had seen the finished work in person.

“I got teary-eyed. ... I didn’t think I’d have that reaction,” Andrea Aguilar said.

Groesbeck painted Lola’s portrait from photographs he’d taken.

Lola said she didn’t think she would have been able to stay still long enough for Groesbeck to complete the painting.

Groesbeck said he finished the painting the night his father died in May.

“So, it’s sort of a special piece of art,” he said.

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