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Volunteers, patrons make Labor Day breakfast at War Memorial Park a success

Fundraiser makes an average profit between $8,000 and $10,000 each year for the park

September 02, 2013|By RICHARD F. BELISLE | richardb@herald-mail.com
  • Jack Lauer, left, and Joseph Peyton, members of the Martinsburg (W.Va.) Kiwanis Club, are busy Monday morning making eggs for the hundreds of people attending the annual Labor Day breakfast at War Memorial Park in Martinsburg.
By Joe Crocetta, Staff Photographer

MARTINSBURG, W.Va. — It took two big grills to cook the 250 steaks and another one for the 175 slices of country ham to feed the crowd of more than 400 people at Monday’s annual Labor Day breakfast at War Memorial Park in Martinsburg.

Harold Catrow, a volunteer at the event, said it  was the 41st year for the event, which has become a standard fundraiser to benefit the park.

Bonn A. “Buzz” Poland, another longtime breakfast volunteer, said an average profit each year runs between $8,000 and $10,000.

“We expect to make about as much again this year,” Poland said about halfway through the morning’s serving.

Breakfast is served from 7:30 to 10:30 a.m.

Poland, who chairs the ticket committee, said the breakfast has brought in hundreds of thousands of dollars over the years.

About 100 volunteers, ticket sellers, cooks and servers work at the breakfast every year.

Catrow singled out five volunteers who have been there since the beginning, including Virginia Sine, who serves the scrambled eggs, plus cooks Doug Fries, Robert Foltz, Bobby Long and Glen Sherrard.

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Patrons, like Douglas and Joan Roach, who have been breakfast regulars over the years, add to its continued success.

“We never miss it,” Joan Roach said.

Lucy Hoffman of Ranson, W.Va., and Judy Quinnam of Hedgesville, W.Va., members of the Piece Makers Quilt Guild, brought this year’s edition to display at the breakfast. Every year, the quilters make and raffle a quilt as a fundraiser.

This year’s beneficiary is Meals on Wheels.

Guild members take their quilt around to various events to sell tickets for $1 each or six for $5.

The raffle brings in about $2,000.

Editor's note: This story was corrected September 3 to reflect that Harold Catrow is a volunteer at the event.

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