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Planetarium schedule announced

August 28, 2013

The 2013-14 schedule of public programs at the William M. Brish Planetarium has been released by Washington County Public Schools. Programs are scheduled at 5:30 and 7 p.m. on the first and fourth Tuesdays each month, unless otherwise noted. If schools are closed or dismissed early that day, the planetarium program is canceled.

Here is this year’s schedule:

Sept. 3 and 24, and Oct. 1

5:30 to 6:15 p.m. — Finding Your Way Around Earth and Sky — Take a journey to the center of the Earth and find out how your location on the Earth directly affects the seasons you experience.  Recommended for upper elementary through adult audiences.

7 to 8 p.m. — Navigating with Meriweather Lewis and William Clark — See how Lewis and Clark navigated their way through their famous journey and how the sun, moon and stars played a role in their travels. Recommended for upper elementary through adult audiences.

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Oct. 22, Nov. 12 (second Tuesday) and 25 (Monday)

5:30 to 6:15 p.m. — Finding Comet ISON (for children) — Have you heard about Comet ISON? Could Comet ISON be the “Comet of the Century?”  How can you find it and just what is a comet anyway? Find out all of this and more in “Finding Comet ISON.” Recommended for elementary through middle school audiences.

7 to 8 p.m. — Finding Comet ISON (adults) — Comet ISON will be visible soon, but just how bright will this comet be? Learn about the history of comets, where they come from, and what to expect when Comet ISON comes to a sky near you. Recommended for adult audiences.

Dec. 3, 10 and 17

5:30 to 6:15 p.m. — Winter Wonders (for children) — Join two curious children as they explore the mystery of the Star of Bethlehem and the Winter Solstice. Hear cultural stories for the Sun’s triumphant return from China, Africa, Polynesia and many more stops from around the globe. Recommended for elementary through middle school audiences.

7 to 8 p.m. — A Holiday Story — What do the stars have to do with Christmas trees, St. Nick and the Three Wise Men? Find out with “A Holiday Story.” Recommended for middle school through adult audiences.

Jan. 7 and 28, and Feb. 4

5:30 to 6:15 p.m. — Doing Citizen Science — How can you do the work of a real astronomer? Come learn how to participate in Citizen Science Projects from the comfort of your own home. Featuring Citizen Science Projects found on Zooniverse.org.  Recommended for upper elementary through adult audiences.

7 to 8 p.m. — New Horizons — The New Horizons mission is well on its way to study the dwarf planet Pluto. Come learn about the New Horizons spacecraft and its journey through the outer solar system. Recommended for middle school through adult audiences.

Feb. 25, March 4 and 25

5:30 to 6:15 p.m. — Astronomy Resources — Interested in learning about what’s beyond our little blue planet, but not sure where to start? Come and learn about some great free online resources. Recommended for elementary through adult audiences.

7 to 8 p.m. — Cowboy Astronomer — Take a tour of the night sky and learn the history of some constellations — cowboy style. Recommended for upper elementary through adult audiences.

April 1 and 22, and May 6

5:30 to 6:15 p.m. — Telescope Clinic — Have a telescope, but not sure where to start? Looking to buy a telescope, but too many choices got you down? Interested in how a telescope allows you to see back in time? Come to our telescope clinic to learn all this and other topics. Recommended for upper elementary through adult audiences.

7 to 8 p.m. — Galileo: The Power of the Telescope — More than 400 years ago, Galileo revolutionized astronomy and science by using a telescope to observe the sky.  Witness the history and modern uses of the scientific instrument. Recommended for middle school through adult audiences.

Admission is $3 for adults, $2 for children and students (with a maximum of $10 per family) and free for senior citizens with a Gold Card.

The planetarium is at 820 Commonwealth Ave. in Hagerstown.

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