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Old Home Week photo draws town residents to Greencastle's square

August 07, 2013|By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com
  • Charlotte Richardson, left, and photographer James Ivey with Central Photo Co. of Washington, D.C., took three panoramic photos Wednesday morning of the hundreds of people gathered in the square in Greencastle, Pa., for the official Old Home Week 2013 group photo.
By Joe Crocetta/Staff Photographer

GREENCASTLE, Pa. — Trying to take a good family photo is a difficult enough feat to accomplish.

Imagine how James Ivey feels every three years when he’s tasked with the job of capturing Greencastle’s growing town family during the Official Old Home Week group photo.

“We get here about 10:30 (a.m.) or 11 (a.m.), and it’s totally deserted,” said Ivey. “At 11:25 (a.m.), there are 2,000 people in the plaza. I don’t know where they come from, but it’s wonderful,” he said with a chuckle.

Ivey, owner of Central Photo Co. in Washington, D.C., has been taking the town’s official photo since the 1970s.

During Wednesday’s official town photo, Ivey used a new digital panoramic camera instead of his former film version to capture the shot.

He takes tour group photos at the U.S. Capitol, but Ivey said this is the photo shoot to which he looks forward.

“I get a kick out of this one. The work I do at the Capitol is repetitive, but this is exciting because it’s the biggest group I take,” Ivey said. “This is the one I brag about. The whole town comes out for this picture. That’s what’s so neat about it.”

Men, women, children and dogs stood six deep in a curved semicircle around the square waiting for instructions.

“Stay behind the orange line. Stay behind the orange line,” shouted Charlotte Richardson, Ivey’s assistant.

Then, Richardson asked for quiet and “chins up.”

“Don’t move in the middle. Don’t move in the middle,” Richardson said.

But, once the camera began rolling, 12-year-old Ethan Murr and his brother Adam, 11, just couldn’t resist running to the other side.

“We’re trying to be in the picture twice,” Ethan said.

Due to the nature of panoramic photos, there is a chance to be seen in the same photo twice.

“It’s tradition,” the boys’ mother, Krista Murr, said about the group photo. “We have been here 12 years and this is our fourth picture.”

So far the family has enmeshed itself in everything Old Home Week.

“There is something every day,” Krista Murr said.

“I love it all,” Ethan said.

Lori Henrich is originally from North Carolina, but now that her family calls Greencastle home, she wanted her kids, Emma, 10, and Adam, 8, to be part of the Old Home Week photo.

Next Old Home Week, Emma and Adam are going to try to be in the photo twice.

“It (Old Home Week) is fun and I think it’s really nice that everybody gets into it so much, and we enjoy it and hopefully we’ll start some traditions with our own family,” she said.

After the official photo, 99-year-old Viola (Daley) Plum of Greencastle peered into the window of the Old Home Week headquarters looking at a black-and-white photo.

“I remember this one very well,” Plum said.

As she looked closer, she pointed out a stunning 19-year-old version of herself standing on Baltimore Street in Greencastle in a 1932 Old Home Week official group photo.

She gets a kick out of seeing herself and seeing old friends who are no longer here.

“I knew I had a yellow dress on and a band around my head,” she said.

For her, participating in the Old Home Week photos is important.

“I think you see a lot of old friends and family, but old friends — mostly,” Plum said.

“It’s just a wonderful, wonderful time for everyone. As far as I know, there’s no other town that puts on a celebration like Greencastle’s Old Home Week,” said Plum’s granddaughter Judy (Plum) Craig.

 


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