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At least 12 groups eye purchase of Franklin County-owned nursing home

Transitions Healthcare and New Dawn Retirement Services completed tours conducted by a consultant and nursing home staff

July 25, 2013|By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com
  • Franklin County, Pa., officials are looking to sell the county-owned Falling Spring Nursing and Rehabilitation Center on Franklin Farm Lane in Chambersburg, Pa. County officials said at least 12 groups are considering submitting proposals to buy it.
Herald-Mail file photo

CHAMBERSBURG, Pa. — At least 12 groups are considering submitting proposals to buy the Franklin County-owned Falling Spring Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, county officials said Thursday.

County officials have distributed packets to a dozen skilled nursing providers seeking information about the possible sale of the nursing home, according to Franklin County Commissioner David Keller.

“At least two vendors have been in to tour the facility, and I believe a couple other tours are in the works,” Keller said Thursday.

Transitions Healthcare and New Dawn Retirement Services completed tours conducted by a consultant and nursing home staff, Keller said.

“Our staff has had a positive impression from their interaction with the companies that have toured,” he said, noting the businesses provided good feedback as well.

Falling Spring Nursing and Rehabilitation Center employs 223 people.

The commissioners are looking for a company or agency with a business plan that reflects a commitment to caring for people, particularly those who are Medicaid eligible, Keller said.

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“We’re hoping we’ll have several prospective buyers with a proven track record in terms of quality of care,” he said.

Proposals are due Aug. 12.

The commissioners previously said they are not obligated to sell the 186-bed facility to the highest bidder, and can visit the buyers’ existing sites and evaluate their backgrounds. They said they can reject all offers.

A consultant has told the board it can expect to receive $6.5 million to $9.3 million, based on market values of similar skilled nursing centers.

The county first opened as an almshouse for the elderly in 1808.

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