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Letters to the Editor - July 21

July 21, 2013


To the editor:

Mr. Zaleski (July 14) comes to zap philosophy with his materialistic light saber. All we need, he says, are hard sciences to give us, “smartphones, automobiles, A/C, airplanes, surgery, drug therapy, and electricity,” and these advances, “did not spring from theology.”

I do not see on his list some of those apparently minor things like truth, beauty, and the common good. And no notice of the technology of all those medieval monks and believers? The book of wisdom told them, “Thou hast arranged all things by measure and number and weight” — wonderfully documented in “The Medieval Machine” by Jean Gimpel.

His list omits other wonderful inventions like gas chambers, calculated mass starvations, atom bombs, a billion dollar internet porn industry, millions of children killed “legally” yearly and other “benefits” brought to us by atheistic nontheologians.

He claims that “logic without empiricism often results in fantasy,” and uses this to denigrate Thomas Aquinas. Sorry, scientists know that is like saying 1+1 often results in 3. Apply the rules of any system of logic correctly and the answer must be true. One may challenge the initial axioms, but as long as we agree parallel lines do not meet, the logic of plane geometry will not “often result in a fantasy” of intersecting parallel lines.

Thomas Aquinas started his system of logic on the basis that is real, that things change — the rule of noncontradiction and other basics from Aristotle’s logic apply, and gave us one of the wonders of the human intellect. If Mr. Zaleski had taken the time to read Aquinas’ “Summa Theologica” and “Summa Contra Gentiles” he would understand the logic of angels and their nature as pure spirits. Spirits take up no space and are where they act. Ergo any number can be “on the head of a pin” — a simple student exercise. Is this more strange than light being measured as a wave or particle, or a strict empiricist believes in an infinite multiverse he can never observe?


Richard Giovanoni
Hagerstown



Downtown needs private, not public, investment


To the editor:

In response to the editorial on Tuesday, July 9, the Hagerstown TEA Party would like to offer a difference of opinion about the impending tax increase on city properties. The recent city election was not about city residents opposed to development of the downtown and investment in the downtown. The recent city election was about the process that was used to not involve the residents and solicit opinions of the taxpayers about what is needed downtown. And about spending taxpayer money!

The city is in dire need of development and investment ... but by the private sector, not more investment by the taxpayers. This is where The Herald-Mail should offer a correction in its editorial. The taxpayers sent a message to the elected officials through their vote that taxing the city residents for a stadium project is not how city residents wanted to spend the taxpayer money. No one disputed that there is a need for revitalization of the downtown. But the private sector can revitalize a dying downtown and even build a stadium. Look what Perdue did for Wicomico County and in return got naming rights for the stadium.

In addition, the road to lower taxes is always about spending less. Fewer government jobs and more private sector jobs are what is needed, and the city is a great place to implement this ideology. The fact that Washington County is well known throughout the area for having the best social service programs is the reason Washington County attracts the nonpaying taxpayers who consume the resources within the city. If you want to increase the tax base, you must increase the number of taxpayers. You don’t ask those to pay more, you increase the number of those paying. Furthermore, money from Annapolis and Washington is still taxpayer money.

The City of Hagerstown can lead by example by decreasing the spending and increasing the number of private investments by becoming a business friendly environment where new businesses want to locate. It is time to lead by example to become a vibrant city spurred on by new projects that will benefit one and all in ways that go far beyond simple taxation.

The City of Hagerstown can lead by example by decreasing the spending and increasing the number of private investments by becoming a business-friendly environment where new businesses want to locate. It is time to lead by example to become a vibrant city spurred on by new projects that will benefit one and all in ways that go far beyond simple taxation.


Nancy S. Allen
The Hagerstown TEA Party



School nursing change benefitted students


To the editor:

The letter on July 6 by Rodney Pearson regarding the school health program needs a closer look.

First of all, the decision by the County Commissioners to remove the program from the direction of the Washington County Health Department was not based solely on money for pension plans. A change of the administration from the health department to the board of education in conjunction with Meritus was necessary and needed in order to continue to provide students with optimum health care. As a former school nurse from 1995 to 2005, it is my opinion that the majority of the school health staff welcomed this change.

Mr. Pearson’s letter states that 76 school health staff lost their jobs. It is true that the 76 employees received layoff notices in May 2012 when the county commissioners cut the health department funding for school health in anticipation of the board of education assuming fiscal responsibility for the program. It is not unusual in the State of Maryland for a board of education to have this responsibility.

However, Mr. Pearson neglects the following information regarding the 76 employees that is pertinent. By August 2012, seven school nurses were re-employed by the health department in other nursing areas. One nurse was eligible for retirement and 10 nurses were hired by Meritus to work in school health offices.

Additionally, six licensed practical nurses and 26 certified medical technicians were hired by Meritus in school health positions and one certified medical technician was hired by the board of education to work in school health. This total represents 50 of the 76 that are gainfully employed.

Most importantly, the school health staff indicates that they receive tremendous support from both the board of education and Meritus Health enabling them to successfully provide outstanding care for students, families and staff. The change in administration is a win for students for sure.


Carolyn G. Donegan
Hagerstown

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