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Orchard View students excel in Math Olympiads

July 08, 2013
  • The Orchard View Intermediate School fourth-graders who participated in the Math Olympiads include, bottom row, from left, Elizabeth Silver, Sarah Beard, Chloe Sanders, Connor Pique, Tyleke Blair, Chip Lantz, Bailey Pack, Amira Gladwell and Jayla Shields. Middle row, Ashlyn Miller, Jack Reisenweber, Stephen Rice, Brandon Cannon, James Dailey, Addison Hughes, Jordan Steward, Edward Engle, Drew Grove and Darin Barrett. Top row, Jessica Powell, Elijah Renzy, Paige Porter, Ava Kilmer, Katherine Hill, Kayla Miller and teacher Mary Beth Twigg.
Submitted photo

MARTINSBURG, W.Va. — Students from Orchard View Intermediate School, along with students from other Berkeley County Schools and nearly 150,000 students worldwide, participated in the Math Olympiad program this past school year. 

Under the direction of Cindy Evarts, Michelle Mullenax and Mary Beth Twigg, students were taught to solve unusual and difficult problems and to think creatively.

Berkeley County Schools has incorporated the Math Olympiads in its program to provide a challenge to high-ability math students.  

In addition to the national competition, Berkeley County Schools’ math coordinator, Anne Laskey, organized a yearlong local challenge in which students from the intermediate and middle schools competed for team and individual awards.
 
Laskey presented both Orchard View Olympiad teams with awards recognizing them as the winning grade-level teams for Berkeley County intermediate schools. 

Students also were presented with awards for placing individually at the school and county levels.

All students were recognized with certificates for their participation, and some students won national awards for excellence within the elementary division.

The silver pin is awarded to those in the top 10 percent. Fifth-graders Rebekah Avey, Neva Pope and Quincy Williams achieved that honor.

Each year, the Math Olympiads serves more than 100,000 students on nearly 5,000 teams nationally and about 50,000 students on 2,000 teams in more than 30 other countries. 

Since 1979, it has provided challenging, thought-provoking problems that stretch the abilities of students in grades four to eight, strengthening their foundation for more advanced studies. 


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