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Pa. teen completes informational battlefield sign as Eagle Scout project

June 09, 2013|By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com
  • Boy Scout Will Manning, 15, made a sign with information about the Battle of Monterey Pass for visitors to the battlefield site in Washington Township, Pa. The Waynesboro, Pa.-area resident took on the community service project as part of the requirements to become an Eagle Scout.
Photo by Jennifer Fitch

BLUE RIDGE SUMMIT, Pa. — Will Manning knew nothing of the Battle of Monterey Pass before he started his Eagle Scout project, but 80 hours of work on an informational sign for the battlefield filled in the blanks.

Will, 15, built a wooden sign with informative text and images to help visitors understand what happened during the mountaintop Civil War battle.

The 4-by-8-foot sign at Monterey Pass Battlefield Park off Pa. 16 in Blue Ridge Summit describes what happened there on the night of July 4, 1863.

Last week, Will joined his father, John, and Washington Township, Pa., officials in commemorating his contribution to the municipal-owned battlefield park.

Eagle Scout is the highest rank in the Boy Scouts of America program. Scouts must complete a service project that benefits the community as one of the requirements to achieve that rank.

“It’s a wonderful organization,” John Manning said.

Will, a St. Maria Goretti High School student, participates in Troop 31, which is based in Fairfield, Pa.

He participates in Scouting to spend time with friends and to build his résumé.

“It’s fun, and it’s a really good thing to have when applying for a job,” he said.

Flohr Lumber Co. and Lowe’s donated materials for the sign. Mark Miller of Boonsboro, a friend and co-worker of John Manning, also contributed to the project.

“People seem to like it,” Will said.

Washington Township’s park system has been the beneficiary of several Eagle Scout projects, Township Planner Clint Rock said.

“This is a fabulous addition to this place,” Township Manager Mike Christopher said.

The Mannings worked on the sign in the basement of their Waynesboro, Pa.-area home and installed it on a rainy night.

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