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Renfrew Institute's Earth Celebration Day full of fun and education

April 27, 2013|By ROXANN MILLER | roxann.miller@herald-mail.com
  • A group of kids play along with Slim Harrison's Sunnyland Band on Saturday during Renfrew Institute's Earth Celebration Day and Festival of Art.
By Roxann Miller

WAYNESBORO, Pa. — It was a day of education and fun Saturday at Renfrew Institute’s Earth Celebration Day and Festival of Art.

Now in its 23rd year, about 40 exhibitors and environmental artists set up on the lawn at Renfrew Park from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. About 500 people attended Saturday’s event.

Renfrew Park is the most beautiful park in Waynesboro, said Melodie Anderson-Smith, executive director of Renfrew Institute, and she said it’s the perfect place to bring people outdoors to celebrate the Earth.

Exhibitors provided information on forestry, recycling and alternative energy.

In addition, about 40 people sold their wares at the recycle/reuse yard sale held in conjunction with Earth Celebration Day from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with space rental benefiting Renfrew Institute.

Olivia Hammond of Waynesboro and her family took a break from the activities and relaxed on a blanket under a shade tree.

“We came to celebrate Earth Day at Renfrew,” said Hammond as her daughter, Savannah, 4, reclined on her lap.

Hammond’s son, Preston, 7, joined the group under the tree after performing in Slim Harrison’s Sunnyland Band.

“It was pretty cool,” Preston said about his musical experience. “I played the washboard.”

Hammond’s friend, Terri Enfusse, and her daughter, Ana, also were taking a break on the blanket.

The Enfusse family are advocates of reusing and recycling.

“Ana is learning about Earth Day in school and as Ana says, ‘We’ll be extinct if we don’t recycle,’ so we recycle at home,” Enfusse said.

Slim Harrison put together an improv group of band members to play a variety of instruments, including drums.

Anna Sophia Kahn, 4, of Gettysburg, Pa., happily beat on a hand-made drum covered in animal skin.

As she drummed, her father, Alex, said he hoped his daughter continued to be an advocate for the Earth as she grows up.

“Every year, it becomes more and more of a disaster zone with climate change,” he said. “I’m sure by the time she is 20 or 30, the way we are going now, it’s going to be a worldwide disaster. We need to do all we can to slow it down.”

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