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Barbara Ingram School for the Arts students parody movies for film festival

Maryland International Film Festival wants to see more offerings from other schools next year

April 12, 2013|By DON AINES | dona@herald-mail.com
  • Mariah Chapelle, left, Hannah Smyle and Bradley Hull view several short films produced by professionals during the Maryland International Film Festival at Bridge of Life on Friday. The three are Boonsboro High School students .
By Ric Dugan/Staff Photographer

And the winner is .... “Mr. Congeniality” by the sophomore theater students of the Barbara Ingram School for the Arts.

Three entries by students from the Barbara Ingram School for the Arts, each a parody of major motion pictures, were screened Friday at the Bridge of Life as part of the Maryland International Film Festival Hagerstown.

“Mr. Congeniality” was a twist on the 2000 Sandra Bullock film, “Miss Congeniality.” In the students’ version, two male FBI agents have to enter a beauty pageant.

“We had a different idea in the beginning and it kind of developed into the whole transition from a man to a woman,” said Lancelot Douglas, one of the transformed FBI agents.

The Barbara Ingram School’s freshmen produced a game show sing-off of Disney tunes pitting Ariel, Pocahontas, Cinderella and the rest of the Disney princesses against Captain America, The Hulk, Batwoman and other super heroes.

The princesses won.

The seniors’ entry had Forrest Gump on a bench chatting with various characters from other Tom Hanks movies. It had a pretty good punchline involving the 2000 film, “Castaway.”

The juniors’ entry, however, could not be screened, apparently due to it being in a format incompatible with the theater’s projection system.

Their entry was “The Sound of Hi-Ho,” combining “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” and “The Sound of Music,” a school official said.

Though the sophomores won, a learning curve could be seen from youngest to oldest, as both camera technique and writing showed greater sophistication.

The Maryland International Film Festival wants to see more offerings from other schools at next year’s event, Vice President Tracie Hovey said.

“We’d like to have one (film) from every school at least,” Hovey said. “It’s a great way to help build the festival and educate the students about the importance of film and why it’s fun.”

The students in attendance also got to view several short films produced by professionals, as well as “Valor in the Streets,” a documentary about battles in and around Hagerstown as the Confederate forces conducted a fighting retreat from the Battle of Gettysburg in July 1863.

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