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Letters to the Editor - Dec. 19

December 19, 2012

Hug your loved ones, just because you can

To the editor:

My daughter is a student at Salem Avenue Elementary School. It is a place where she loves to be, where she thrives and grows in the tender care of the wonderful teachers and staff. I have said this before and will continue to say it; I am so very grateful for her school and all that they have done to help mold her little being. And knowing her teachers as I do, I can imagine that they all are struggling greatly with the tragedy in Connecticut. The days ahead and the changes that will most likely come about in schools everywhere will be difficult for students and teachers alike. I will be keeping them all in my thoughts and prayers.

I share today with so many across this country a heart that is heavy beyond words — trying to wrap my brain around how something like this could ever happen. I can’t even begin to imagine how those 20 parents feel. I don’t think I could ever survive losing my child like that. But I am also thinking of those individuals who are trying to sort through this mess; the teachers, investigators, police officers, medical personnel, task forces — and keeping them in my thoughts and prayers too, as this scene will forever be etched in their hearts.

I will think twice before I complain about how extra security measures at my daughter’s school are an inconvenience to me. I will think twice before I get frustrated because she repeatedly calls out, “Mommy, Mommy, Mommy.” I will think twice before I ever go to sleep angry at her — or anyone else for that matter. She is the most precious gift I have ever received. Every day is a blessing because she is in my life.

Hug your loved ones today — just because you can.

Kristin Kendall
Hagerstown


Aborted children should not be forgotten

To the editor:

My heart is sad at the loss of everyone in Newtown, Conn., especially the children. My heart and prayers go out to them.

It’s gotten the attention of the nation and the world.

Indeed, it was a brutal crime, but let’s not forget the unborn (but still children in God’s eyes) who are murdered every day in the world at abortion clinics legally.

Sherman Jones
Hagerstown


Constitution was written to protect single-shot firearms

To the editor:

On Dec. 16, I saw an ad for a semi-automatic rifle with a 30-round magazine. I’m not a gun enthusiast, and I don’t begrudge those who target shoot or hunt. I’m not a weapons expert, either, but I defy anyone on the planet to explain to me, or to the parents at Sandy Point Elementary School, why civilian magazines larger than 10 rounds are necessary for any reason.

The argument that it is people, not weapons, that kill is nonsensical. On Dec. 14, at an elementary school in China, a man wounded 22 children ages 6 to 11 with a knife. China’s schools have security guards because of previous attacks, but that did not prevent the attack. Anyone with an iota of common sense should realize that if the attacker in China was able to get close enough to 22 children to do damage with a knife, he would have done much more damage had he had a gun. Guns do kill — and much more efficiently than knives, clubs and rocks, which naysayers tragically (in light of the deaths of the 20 children) cite to protect something they think the Constitution guarantees.

The arms to which the Constitution guaranteed citizens were firearms for the expressed purpose of being able to quickly call up citizen militias that had their own arms, and the unexpressed but universally understood need to hunt for food. The firearms to which the Constitution referred were almost all single-shot.

Slavery was allowed in the original Constitution and women were not allowed to vote. But even those hard-nosed sexist, bigoted lawmakers of the past probably would laugh at the idea that a hunter of the present would need to take 30 or more shots to hit a deer or a target before they needed to reload.
 
Ken Hollar
Hagerstown


We must surrender freedom to own heavy weaponry

To the editor:

I am not sure that owning an assault rifle can or should compensate for the failures of a dog-eat-dog society that makes it easier for a wounded, disturbed person to get an automatic weapon than to find love and healing and support in a frightening, dangerous world.

Long ago, our ancestors were absolutely free and absolutely wild, living by the law of the jungle, defending and avenging themselves with rocks and spears, and bows and arrows. The wounded perished by the side of the road, and the strong prevailed and remained free until they grew weak and someone terminated their freedom with a blow to the head.

Somewhere along the line, however, people got sick of all the killing, all the vengeance, all the hurting and decided to put down their weapons and relinquish some of their absolute freedom in order to invest in a little thing called “civilization,” which promised them some peace and love and sanity in return for those aspects of their absolute freedom that they were agreeing to put aside for the greater good.

I think it is time for Americans once again to invest in the idea of civilization — and for the sake of the peace and sanity of our society to surrender some of our absolute freedom to own machine guns and other forms of heavy weaponry. Let those who love guns join the military or the police and put their love of weaponry to work defending our country from those who would disturb the peace. There is a big difference between a freedom-loving soldier under discipline and a scared civilian loading his machine gun in front of his TV.

As a Christian at this holy season of Christmas, and at any time, I am not sure that I want to be holding a smoking assault rifle when Christ returns as a little child.

Sam Cuthbert
Hagerstown

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