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Boonsboro Town Council OKs zoning changes for nursery expansion

July 03, 2012|By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com
  • Chris and Selena Doyle, owners of Mountainside Gardens, are shown in this 2011 Herald-Mail file photo. The Boonsboro Town Council Monday night approved land-use changes for properties on Main Street that will allow for an expansion of the Doyles' plant nursery.
Herald-Mail file photo

BOONSBORO — Despite concerns from a neighbor, the Boonsboro Town Council Monday night approved land-use changes for properties on Main Street that will allow for an expansion of a plant nursery.

The owners of Mountainside Gardens, who acquired 309 S. Main St., requested that the zoning for the house be changed from suburban residential to general commercial.

They also asked that the rest of the business at the location be changed from neighborhood residential to general commercial.

Chris Doyle, owner of the nursery, told council members he eventually wants to turn the house at 309 S. Main St. into a garden center. Before that, Doyle said he plans to lease the house for a year or two.

Neida Otto, who lives at 305 S. Main St., raised concerns about the zoning change during a public hearing Monday night.

Otto said there is a sign at the nursery that stays on all night long, and “it’s very annoying.”

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She also wanted to know if the nursery was going to sell stone, and another area resident wanted to know if there will be truck traffic in and out of the business.

For the zoning to be changed, council members had to determine that enough properties in the neighborhood had changed to businesses, Town Planner Megan Clark said.

Although Councilwoman Barbara Wetzel said she believed the makeup of the neighborhood had changed, Otto said there has always been businesses in the area.

“We are a residential area, not business. We want to stay residential,” Otto said.

Otto’s husband, Rudolph, said a pine tree near the nursery that used to block light from the sign had been cut down.

Wetzel asked Doyle if new trees could be planted to act as a buffer from the sign, but Doyle said there is not enough room to plant trees.

Doyle said he thinks he will improve the house at 309 S. Main St., compared to its former use as a rental property.

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