Advertisement

Bark for Life digs up $1,200 to fight cancer

About 50 people and their dogs made laps Sunday at Fairgrounds Park

May 06, 2012|By DAVE McMILLION | davem@herald-mail.com
  • Sigi Scholle, of Falling Waters, W.Va., left, Penny Gaver of Hagerstown and Cathy Thomas of Hagerstown, walk their dogs around the track at Fairgrounds Park Sunday during at fifth annual Bark for Life of Washington County, an American Cancer Society fundraiser leading up the annual Relay for Life.
By Ric Dugan, Staff Photographer

Evelyn Lyons made a lap around Fairgrounds Park Sunday afternoon with her friend Ducati, both of whom were working to make the world a better place for cancer patients.

Ducati is a whippet and besides looking like a greyhound, Lyons said the breed is known for its loving nature.

“She actually sleeps in our bed under the blanket,” said Lyons, who also walked with her dog Puddy, a Maltese.

Lyons and her two canine friends were participating in the fifth annual Bark for Life of Washington County, an American Cancer Society fundraiser leading up the annual Relay for Life, another cancer society fundraiser scheduled for June 15 and 16 at Fairgrounds Park.

In Bark for Life, money is raised by walkers who pay a $20 entry fee to walk dogs in laps around the park. Each additional dog costs $10, said event coordinator Missy DeHaven.

About 50 people turned out for the fundraiser and about $1,200 was raised, DeHaven said.

Advertisement

Because everything needed for Sunday’s event was donated, all the money raised goes to the American Cancer Society, DeHaven said.

“Cancer barked up the wrong tree,” DeHaven said.

Mayor Robert E. Bruchey II worked with Washington County Board of Commissioners member Jeffrey A. Cline and cancer survivor Garnet Stevens to judge dogs for various titles, including largest and smallest dog, longest and shortest tail, and best trick, and in an owner and dog look-alike contest.

Other activities included a musical dog sit, where dogs and their owners walked around in a circle while music played. When the music stopped, owners had to command their dogs to sit. The last dog to sit was out of the contest.

“That was comical,” DeHaven said.

The goal for this year’s Relay for Life is $200,000, organizers said.

Relay for Life begins at 6 p.m. June 15.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|