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Waynesboro Area Senior High School's foreign language department recognized

Pennsylvania State Modern Language Association presented school with basic Globe award

March 21, 2012|By JENNIFER FITCH | waynesboro@herald-mail.com
  • Fickes
Fickes

WAYNESBORO, Pa. — “Felicitaciones,” “gratulatione” or “congratulations” might be in order for Waynesboro Area Senior High School’s foreign language department, which recently won a statewide award for its programs.

The Pennsylvania State Modern Language Association recognizes private and public schools with four levels of “Globe” awards each year. The association looks at criteria that include enrollment in programs, retention of students in those programs and cultural offerings outside the classroom.

About 692 students — or 55 percent of Waynesboro’s high school population — take a foreign language class.

“They’re not required to take any language. It’s an elective program, a strong elective program,” said Karen Fickes, who teaches French.

Many colleges do require foreign language education for admission, she said.

Foreign-language teachers at the school are Fickes, Bonita Horsey, Barb Fox, Kelly Dietrich, Elizabeth Mummert, Karen Lay and Tarja Wilson. The school offers French, Latin, German and Spanish.

Waynesboro will be presented a basic Globe award at a conference in April. Horsey said adding standards testing in future years might help the school move into the bronze, silver or gold levels of the awards.

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Past winners are prestigious schools across the state, according to Horsey, who teaches French and Spanish.

“The criteria are pretty stringent. ... It’s a very nice recognition of our program. We do have a very strong program, and not a lot of school districts do,” she said.

The high school’s foreign language department submitted an application for the award at a time when budgetary constraints prompted changes to the district’s offerings. The school board eliminated foreign language classes at the elementary and middle schools, and scheduling issues led to classes being combined at the high school.

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