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Young parishioners assemble care packages for military members

September 11, 2011|By JULIE E. GREENE | julieg@herald-mail.com
  • Jennifer Moschel, left, holds a care package for Caroline Fraser while Emily Moschel, center, packs other care packages that will be sent to four military members with ties to St. Mark's Episcopal Church near Boonsboro.
By Chris Tilley/Staff Photographer

BOONSBORO — Devon Groesbeck was only 2 years old when terrorists struck the U.S. on Sept. 11, 2001, but she remembers her parents watching TV “for hours on end.”

Annie Beachley remembers working on a journal entry in second grade at Paramount Elementary School when the principal announced the school day was ending and asking her mom why the teachers were frantic.

“I didn’t really know what was going on. I was pretty young. But, you know, everything kind of made sense a week later,” said Annie, 17, a senior at North Hagerstown High.

The two girls were among a group of young parishioners at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church who packed care packages Sunday for four military members. Three of the troops are parishioners and the fourth is the son of parishioners, the Rev. Anne Weatherholt said.

Army member Danny Fraser, of Williamsport; Air Force Staff Sgt. Casey J. Carter; and Lt. Timothy Berger of the Marines are in Afghanistan, Weatherholt said. Seaman Recruit Samuel H. McLaughlin is in Navy boot camp in Great Lakes, Ill.

The group of teens set up tables outside the stone church on Lappans Road, northwest of Boonsboro, and unpacked boxes and bags of cereal bars, fruit snacks, fruit cups, ramen noodles, raisins, cracker sandwiches, socks, soap, toothpaste, pencils and more.

Then they divided the goodies and packed them in boxes for the military members.

The church’s younger parishioners, many of whom were born after the terrorist attacks, read “The Little Chapel That Stood,” Weatherholt said. The book is about St. Paul’s Episcopal Chapel, which is near ground zero and served as an “oasis of peace” after the attacks, she said.

In addition to Weatherholt’s sermon about 9/11, the church had a liturgy of prayers at its Sunday services, and a notebook containing the names of those who died on 9/11, as well as those who were killed in the attack on the USS Cole on Oct. 12, 2000.

“A lot of local people remember that a member of our congregation, Craig Wibberley, was killed on the USS Cole,” Weatherholt said.

Washington County resident Patrick Roy also was killed in that attack.

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