Advertisement

Squeeze in a book before going back to school

August 18, 2011|By LESLEY MASON | Special to The Herald-Mail
  • "The Invention of Hugo Cabret" combines text with intricate drawings to tell the story of a 12-year-old orphan, clock-keeper and thief. It's a good book to read before returning to school in Washington County on Aug. 24.
"The Invention of Hugo Cabret" combines text with intricate drawings to tell the story of a 12-year-old orphan, clock-keeper and thief. It's a good book to read before returning to school in Washington County on Aug. 24.

“David Goes To School” By David Shannon
Ages 4 to 8
David shows up late to class, chews gum, yells answers out of turn, pulls pigtails, stares out the window, cuts in line, has a food fight, lingers at recess, and draws on his desk. This title will remind all children about appropriate classroom behavior.

“Swimmy” By Leo Lionni
Ages 4 to 8
Swimmy shows his friends how ingenuity and teamwork can overcome any danger. With its graceful text and stunning artwork, this Caldecott Honor Book will teach children to brave the unknown.
 
“Al Capone Does My Shirts” By Gennifer Choldenko
Ages 9 to 12
Set in 1935, 12-year-old “Moose” Flanagan and his family move from Santa Monica to Alcatraz Island where his father gets a job as an electrician at the prison. When Moose and the warden’s daughter start a business charging school children five cents to have their clothes washed by the prisoners, they end up in hot water.
 
“Soul Surfer: A True Story of Faith, Family, and Fighting to Get Back on the Board” By Bethany Hamilton
Ages 9 to 12
Now a major motion picture, this story chronicles the life of Bethany Hamilton, who lost her arm in a shark attack off the coast of her native Hawaii, but never lost her determination.
 
“The Invention of Hugo Cabret” By Brian Selznick
Ages 9 to 12
Hugo lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, where his survival depends on secrets and anonymity. When Hugo’s world suddenly collides with an eccentric girl and a bitter old man, his undercover life, and his most precious secret, are both put in jeopardy. A film adaptation directed by Martin Scorsese is expected in theaters in November.

“The Sound and the Fury” By William Faulkner
Ages 13 and older
One of the definitive novels of the 20th century, it explores intense family relationships where there is no love, only self-centeredness. A wonderful title for parents to revisit as their teen discovers it for the first time.

“A Long Way Gone” By Ishmael Beah
Ages 13 and older
Beah tells a riveting story of how at the age of 12, he fled attacking rebels and wandered a land ravaged by violence. By 13, he’d been picked up by the government army, and Beah, at heart a gentle boy, found that he was capable of truly terrible acts.

Lesley Mason is children and teen librarian at Washington County Free Library.

Advertisement
The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|