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Letter to the Editor - Aug. 2

August 02, 2011

Women might have an issue with sharia law


To the editor:

The letter by S. V. Yumlu defending sharia law as a “code of ethics for Muslims” should prompt all non-Muslims to learn whatever they can about Islam, upon which these “ethics” are based.

To put it simply, sharia law is an overlapping of Islamic beliefs and civil and criminal law. Middle Eastern nationals (all except Israel) are strongly influenced by sharia law. Wafa Sultan, author of the book “A God Who Hates,” describes the “suppression and misery” she endured for the first 30 years of her life in Syria. In the Middle East, she says, “Women and minorities are deprived of the human rights that we in the West take for granted.” Sharia law goes far beyond simple matters such as how many times a day you must pray and whether alcoholic beverages or meat such as pork and bacon are allowed in your diet.

In Pakistan, an estimated 90 percent of all wives are victims of domestic abuse because sharia law says husbands should beat their wives to keep them obedient. If a woman is raped, she cannot report the crime and expect any justice unless she can provide four male witnesses to back up her claim. In Jordan, honor killings are legal because sharia law says that a person (usually a daughter) who brings “shame” on her family can be put to death by her own father.

These are some of the examples of how a nation can be taken over by one religion and life can become brutally harsh and filled with fear. If we do not fear sharia law, it is only because we have a guarantee of Separation of Church and State in the United States Constitution. It is not wrong to stand up and declare that this freedom, which millions of people in the Middle East have never known, must be defended at all costs.


R. M. Brown
Washington, D.C.

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