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Letters to the Editor - Jan. 3

January 02, 2011

Government isn't working for average citizens

To the editor:

What is the purpose of the state? The purpose of the state is to transfer wealth and power from the many to the few.

It does it well.

According to Business Insider, "The rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer at a staggering rate. Once upon a time, the United States had the largest and most prosperous middle class in the history of the world, but now that is changing at a blinding pace."

Here are some of the 22 things that Business Insider points to in support of that assertion.

• Sixty-six percent of the income growth between 2001 and 2007 went to the top 1 percent of all Americans.

• In 1950, the ratio of the average executive's paycheck to the average worker's paycheck was about 30 to 1. Since the year 2000, that ratio has exploded to between 300 and 500 to one.

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• The top 1 percent of U.S. households owns nearly twice as much of America's corporate wealth as they did just 15 years ago.

In every election the candidates, no matter their party, trumpet that they are going to work for "the little guy," "the working man," "the average citizen" and "Main Street, not Wall Street."

In the iconic words of Dr. Phil McGraw, how is that working out for us?

G.F. Miller

Hagerstown

Inmate shouldn't complain about conditions

To the editor:

This is in response to Paul Inskeep's letter regarding the conditions that prisoners are forced to live in ("Wintertime is prisoner's toughest challenge," Saturday, Dec. 4, page A4). He compared his living conditions to that of an animal and the half-mile walk he must endure to eat three meals a day as bone-chilling.

Well, Mr. Inskeep, may I remind you that you are a resident of the Maryland Correctional Training Center. You obviously committed some type of crime to maintain that residence and you gave up any rights you had when you committed said crimes. Did you really expect that you would receive five-star accommodations?

I will say that I am disappointed that you consider wintertime in prison to be your toughest challenge. What exactly would you do if you had a mortgage, utilities, car payments and college tuition to pay for every month in a sagging economy? That is the toughest challenge for many people.

My advice to you is to stop complaining about the conditions you are forced to live in by your own accord and make the best of it. Be thankful for the three hot meals and a cot that you receive. You are not there on vacation and it is not a hotel.

Kathleen Heavner

Hagerstown

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