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Letters to the Editor - Dec. 15

December 15, 2010

Some ideas for what to do with old hospital
 
To the editor:
 
In the coming weeks, conversation will turn from our sparkling new hospital to what to do with the old one.
 
I have a few suggestions. They might be useful to start a conversation, they might be ridiculous. I don't know. I'm just offering some brainstorming.
 
It would be fantastic to get someone to take over the structure. That's ideal, especially if the property can be put on the tax rolls.
 
However, if it is destined to be razed, perhaps it can be used for something first. Maybe it could be marketed to Hollywood. Seems like every other movie or television show is set in a hospital. We have one you can use. We will take your money.  
 
Maybe it could be used for police/homeland security training. What a great setup for training for bad situations.
 
These are two ideas I had the other day and I thought I'd share them. Maybe they're good, maybe they're not. But let's start the discussion.
 
Mike Conroy
Hagerstown

 
 
Help is needed for people of Haiti
 
To the editor:
 
I've read about a cholera outbreak in Haiti that has claimed more than 1,000 lives now.
 
Despite efforts made by President Rene Praval and other organizations such as the United Nations and Doctors Without Borders, cholera has continued to spread throughout Haiti and possibly the island of Hispaniola. The cholera outbreak has done nothing except to increase the misery of the entire country.
 
Cholera is transmitted by feces, and can easily be prevented if people have access to clean drinking water and practice good hygiene such as regularly washing your hands. These sanitary conditions don't exist in much of Haiti and the disease has spread across the country to nearly all of the major population centers, possibly infecting hundreds of thousands of people. The country is in shambles and the rubble and bodies from the earthquake earlier this year still haven't been cleared.
 
There are no roads, but many organizations do want to help. But the extremely wealthy families still lay claim to these pieces of land and are not willing to give them up for houses and trailers.
 
Though help is there, there is no way for it to assist the situation. It is very difficult for a country deemed as "No Man's Land" to build an efficient water system. The money sent in by people cannot be channeled adequately as there is little government.
 
In order to best help these people, organizations need to clear rubble, remove remains and get the land back from those families desperately clinging to it in the face of the damage they are causing.
 
Christian Rudisill
Hagerstown

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