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Trolley brings 'some uniqueness back to Waynesboro'

L.L. Trolley Express now departing for special events

September 29, 2010|By JENNIFER FITCH
  • Larry and Delisa Leonard of Waynesboro, Pa., purchased a 1988 Boyertown Deluxe trolley in May. With the help of several Waynesboro-area businesses, they cleaned and restored the trolley over the summer and started publicly showing it off around Labor Day.
Jennifer Fitch, Staff Writer

WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Larry Leonard might not look much like Mister Rogers, but he does have a trolley in his neighborhood.

Leonard and his wife, Delisa, purchased a 1988 Boyertown Deluxe trolley in May. With the help of several Waynesboro-area businesses, they cleaned and restored the trolley over the summer and started publicly showing it off around Labor Day.

Leonard said he enjoys seeing the people's reactions as he drives past. Some people gape, and others pull their own cars over to take pictures, he said.

"It makes me proud I can bring some uniqueness back to Waynesboro," Leonard said.

Leonard is known to some as LL Dee Jay because of his disc jockey business. He hopes to couple those skills with the new "L.L. Trolley Express," driving bridal parties to weddings and other clients to special events.

The Leonards found the trolley on a website and purchased it from a caterer in Philadelphia. The trolley, which Leonard said is one of 10 of its type in the United States, arrived on a tow truck two weeks later.

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One of the best aspects of the trolley is the wheelchair lift in the back, Leonard said.

That lift required replacement, with installation done by Brown's Welding of Waynesboro. Other work was done by C-Ely Signs & Graphics, Sounds So Good Car Audio, Blazin Auto, McCleaf Bus and Fortney's Upholstery.

In mid-September, Leonard had his first trolley clients -- members of the Fairfield (Pa.) High School Class of 1965 headed to their reunion. On Saturday, he'll display the trolley at Waynesboro's Market Day before heading to another appointment.

Driving the bus-sized trolley is "not as difficult as you'd think," but it requires a commercial driver's license, he said.

Leonard said the trolley originally was made for a company in Japan, although the vehicle never shipped because the trolley manufacturer feared the Japanese customer would copy the model. The president of the trolley company sold it to the caterer, who later sold it to Leonard.

Leonard hopes to use the trolley for wine tours and parades. For now, he and his wife are thrilled to see how people react to the trolley.

"A lot of people have asked us if the trolley service is back in Waynesboro," Delisa Leonard said.

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