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Letters to the Editor

July 23, 2010

People should remember who was there first



To the editor:

I am writing in response to Mr. Creech's June 29, 2010, letter to the editor in The Herald-Mail, concerning noise pollution. It appears that Mr. Creech, like other "transplants," was blinded by the site of his new house to the point that he couldn't see past his new mailbox. I too am a "transplant" from 15 years ago and the first several weekends before deciding where we would like to live in this area, my family and I made several trips up here to see what all was in this area.

I've visited this area for more than 40 years and knew what to expect. I was taught that you don't move into someone's "backyard" and then complain about his livelihood. It never ceases to amaze me to read these letters such as yours complaining about the noise, dust, smell or something to that effect. Then to top it off, you want to change the rules to suit your needs instead of remembering who was here first. This seems to be an ongoing theme nowadays. I hate to disappoint you, but it's not just about you. We all have to live somewhere and the bottom line is life is not fair or perfect. I have nothing but the utmost respect for the farmers and business owners in this area and feel that if the drag strip bothers you that much you have two options: earplugs or find a Realtor.

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Barry L. MartinBoonsboro

Second Amendment has outlived its utility



To the editor:

I would like to comment on James Parsons' letter in the July 17, 2010, Herald-Mail.

Mr. Parsons suggested that all TEA party members work toward the establishment of a constitutional convention as provided for in the current constitution. While most of the changes he suggested would result in unbelievable gridlock and make the country ungovernable, there is one provision in the constitution that such a convention could address. The second amendment has long outlived whatever utility it originally had in providing for "a well-regulated militia" and now provides easy access for criminals to obtain guns.

Eliminating this amendment would open the way for sensible gun control and make life much safer for most citizens. Far more noncriminals are killed by guns, either their own or someone else's, than criminals are killed by law-abiding citizens.

John Warner
Williamsport

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