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Letters to the Editor

July 01, 2010

We need to think about our faith and future



To the editor:

Thank you for printing the recent letter (April 2) by Kate Prado, "Jesus Christ: The real message at Easter."

I can identify with her experience of growing up in church, but still finding the need to personally know Him as Savior. It is all too easy to identify with a particular church or denomination, perhaps for good reasons, but still miss being born again, as Jesus explained in John Chapter 3. A person's first Easter after being born again is much different than just "going through the motions" as before.

It should be noted that the Ethiopian eunuch was a religious man, but the Holy Spirit used Philip to witness to Him about Jesus and lead him to faith. Nicodemas was also a religious man, but Jesus still told him about his need to be born again. A person can be religious but not in the faith. Paul exhorts us to "examine ourselves, whether we be in the faith."

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Also, I think G. F. Miller has a good point in a recent letter about increasing government control over us in health care and the hastening of events described in Revelation. I may add that other areas of increasing government and worldwide control, such as "cap and trade" and heavy economic and financial regulations, are further examples of this direction. We are in an era of increasing government control and micromanagement over our lives. Any honest serious student of the Bible can see the dangerous direction we are going. I think it is time to be thinking more about our future.

Steve Hluchy
Stephens City, Va.




Littering is bad in so many ways



To the editor:

We are here to inform you about littering. It's very, very, very bad and can destroy the environment by polluting rivers and streams. You can get fined up to $1,500 and up to 30 days in prison if you litter.

If you have trash, throw it in a trash bin and take that to the county dump every so often. And always try to recycle as much as you can. Recycling can save tons (literally) of space in trash dumps, and that protects the environment. We hope you will heed this advice and spread around the news. Everyone should know about this and everyone should try to help; and always remember, don't litter.

John Strauss
Justin Mitchell
Daniel Harrast
Sixth-grade students
E. Russell Hicks Middle School




Too much fertilizer affects the Chesapeake Bay



To the editor:

We are writing to you to explain our concerns about people putting too much fertilizer on their lawns in Hagerstown and the surrounding area.

You might think that putting too much fertilizer might make the lawns look better, but it puts so many nutrients in the ground that it just runs off the lawns into the Antietam Creek, which goes into the Potomac River, which in turn goes to the Chesapeake Bay. This increase in nutrients may seem good at first because it increases algae growth, but the increase only lasts for a short while. After the algae dies and starts to decompose, the dead algae use so much oxygen that there is none left for the other organisms and it creates a "dead zone" in the water. This dead zone is called anoxia.

The health of the Chesapeake Bay watershed is very important to us and should be important to you as well.

Breanna Myers and Shelby Resh
Sixth-grade students
E. Russell Hicks Middle School

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