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What Do You Think?

April 03, 2010

The question posted Wednesday on The Herald-Mail's Web site was: Should the U.S. Postal Service discontinue Saturday delivery to homes and businesses?

"The U.S. Postal Service has to stop Saturday delivery to cut costs because it is incredibly inefficient, just like every government entity. Not only do they not earn a profit, but they are subsidized by us, the taxpayer. ... The postal service is the poster child for why government shouldn't run anything in our lives."

"No delivery of mail on Saturday wouldn't bother me a bit. Perhaps no mail delivery on Saturday, but keeping the post office open for a half-day would help."

"Yes. They are in debt like all government-run agencies. Cutting back one day will save money. They will still be in debt, but not hemorrhaging as much. My question is: Will they have to lay off workers or how will this affect the salaries of the employees?"

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"My understanding is the postal service is the only provider of home delivery of regular mail - such things as letters, postcards, bills, junk mail, etc. The private companies compete only in the area of shipping packages. No private enterprise is currently structured to deliver letters, etc., to all businesses or individual homes on a daily basis. I highly doubt any private enterprise wants to try to deliver a letter across the country for 44 cents. No profit in that."

"I would be happy with three days a week - Monday, Wednesday and Friday - if it would keep costs down. It is rare that I receive anything that could not wait another day or two. I would also welcome it if the postal service would give up the junk mail business. Eighty percent of my mail goes straight to the trash can."

"No Saturday delivery would be an inconvenience, but my concern is this talk of it being a slippery slope - cut one day, it's not enough, so you cut a couple of more and so on. There are still businesses and entities that depend on the postal service as a means of running their enterprise. ... Audit the system, but hesitate to start on a path that might eliminate the mail service altogether."

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