Advertisement

MADD has cookies for cops

December 11, 2009|By BRIDGET DiCOSMO

HAGERSTOWN -- Santa isn't the only one getting free cookies this holiday season.

MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving) Maryland has launched its Cookies for Cops campaign for the fourth straight year.

That means officers at the Washington County Sheriff's Department, the Hagerstown Police Department and the Hagerstown barracks of the Maryland State Police will be receiving their share of thousands of cookies being distributed to law enforcement agencies throughout the state, program director Caroline Cash said.

Volunteers and MADD staff members bake the cookies, and each police department gets a few dozen, Cash said.

"We just thought of it several years ago as a way to thank law enforcement for their efforts in keeping drunks off the roads," Cash said.

The National Highway Safety Administration reported a 12.5 percent decline in drunk-driving fatalities statewide in 2008 from the previous year.

In 2008, there were 152 people killed in Maryland as a result of drunk driving-related crashes, or about three people a week, Cash said.

Advertisement

"We still have a tremendous amount of work to do if we lost 152 people," Cash said.

Cash, who delivers the cookies to Washington County agencies, said the campaign was aimed at the holiday season because it is a time when more people likely will be drinking at parties.

"This is our way of supporting the officers and encouraging them," Cash said.

"We've also heard from law enforcement, (asking) could we please deliver them to the night shift because they're usually gone by the time they get there."

MADD makes an effort to make sure every police agency and sheriff's department in Maryland receives cookies during the campaign, Cash said.

"I think it means a lot to them, and I think they know we're a victim assistance organization and know that victims and volunteers appreciate their efforts," Cash said.

The Cookies for Cops campaign started the day after Thanksgiving and will continue until Dec. 31.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|