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WASD technology supervisor position examined

School board and administrators consider the job description

School board and administrators consider the job description

August 11, 2009|By JENNIFER FITCH

WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Changes to a technology supervisor position in the Waynesboro Area School District could expand the responsibilities and nearly double the position's salary.

The school board and administrators are looking at the technology supervisor's job description in preparation for the retirement of Kay Eberly. They're talking about adding duties in an effort to reduce the amount of money spent for consultants.

"It'd also get things done in a more timely manner," board President K. Marilyn Smith said.

The new staff member would supervise the network administrator and technology facilitators. Superintendent James Robertson said a potential salary range has not been set, but similar positions in nearby schools pay $60,000 to $78,000 per year.

At its meeting Tuesday, the school board briefly debated the merits of listing "bachelor's degree" as a requirement for applicants. Drafts of the requirements ask for a degree and/or relevant experience.

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"Having that leeway with relative experience can bring you a very talented person," said board member Firmadge Crutchfield, who said he's found that especially true in the information technology field.

An IT professional might have several certifications, but not a bachelor's degree, board member Greg Ochoa said.

In other business, the board hired a Shippensburg, Pa., math teacher as a new assistant principal at Waynesboro Area Senior High School. A vacancy was created when Brian Richter was transferred to the principal position at Waynesboro Area Middle School.

The vote to hire Matthew Strine, whose annual salary will be $71,000, was 5-3. Voting in favor were Smith, Ochoa, Chris Devers, Mindy Rouzer and Pat Heefner. Voting against were Crutchfield, Ed Wilson and Leland Lemley, all of whom said they had nothing against Strine, but wanted to postpone the expenditure.

"I thought we could hold off for a year and save money," Wilson said.

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