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National votes

June 29, 2009|By Votes in Congress Service

WASHINGTON - Here's how area members of Congress voted on major roll call votes in the week ending June 26:

HOUSE



Homeland Security budget



Voting 389 for and 37 against, the House on June 24 approved a $44 billion Department of Homeland Security budget for fiscal 2010, up 6.5 percent from 2009. The bill (HR 2892) funds agencies such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Customs and Border Patrol, Transportation Security Administration, Coast Guard and Secret Service. The bill bars development of a national ID card, requires threat assessments of Guantanamo Bay prisoners and prohibits spending to block individuals from importing FDA-approved drugs from Canada.

In part, the bill provides $804 million for developing systems to screen cargo entering the U.S. by land and sea; $800 million for installing explosive-detection units at airports; $382 million for cyber security; $241.5 million for Coast Guard operations in the Persian Gulf and off the Somalia coast; and $122.8 million for air-cargo screening.

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A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Roscoe Bartlett, R-6, yes

Pennsylvania

Bill Shuster, R-9, yes

West Virginia

Shelley Moore Capito, R-2, yes

Air marshals budget



Voting 134 for and 294 against, the House on June 24 refused to cut spending in HR 2892 for the Federal Air Marshal Service from $860 million to $819 million. The agency's mission is to station armed marshals on an undisclosed number of passenger flights.

A yes vote was to cut the air marshals budget.

Maryland

Bartlett, yes

Pennsylvania

Shuster, yes

West Virginia

Capito, no

Economic stimulus



Voting 113 for and 318 against, the House on June 24 refused to cut Department of Homeland Security spending in HR 2892 by $2.7 billion, which is the amount of stimulus funds Congress added earlier this year to the department's budget.

A yes vote backed the spending cut.

Maryland

Bartlett, yes

Pennsylvania

Shuster, yes

West Virginia

Capito, no

2010 military budget



Voting 389 for and 22 against, the House on June 25 authorized a $680 billion military budget for fiscal 2010, including $130 billion for war in Iraq and Afghanistan and $9.3 billion for the National Missile Defense. The bill (HR 2647) sets a 3.4 percent military pay raise, increases active-duty personnel by 40,200 troops to 1.4 million troops and bars permanent U.S. military bases in Iraq.

Now awaiting Senate action, the bill authorizes $369 million for F-22 stealth fighter jets that was opposed by the administration on grounds the money would be better spent on conflicts such as the war in Afghanistan.

Additionally, the bill prohibits U.S. control of Iraqi oil revenue; orders Pentagon countermeasures against Somalian piracy; authorizes award of the Purple Heart for traumatic brain injuries; suspends the A-76 program under which private employers compete for work traditionally done by civil servants; and authorizes the Pentagon to share space-surveillance data with foreign governments in order to reduce the threat of satellite collisions.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Bartlett, yes

Pennsylvania

Shuster, yes

West Virginia

Capito, yes

Afghanistan withdrawal



Voting 138 for and 278 against, the House on June 25 defeated an amendment to HR 2647 requiring the Department of Defense report to Congress by the end of the year on any plans to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan.

A yes vote backed the amendment.

Maryland

Bartlett, no

Pennsylvania

Shuster, no

West Virginia

Capito, no

Interrogation videotapes



The House on June 25 required, 224 for and 193 against, the government to videotape all military interrogations, except during combat, and retain the tapes in a secured and classified repository. The amendment was added to HR 2647.

A yes vote backed the amendment.

Maryland

Bartlett, yes

Pennsylvania

Shuster, no

West Virginia

Capito, no

Energy package



Voting 219 for and 212 against, the House on June 26 passed a bill (HR 2454) that would slowly shift U.S. energy production and consumption from carbon-based fuels to renewable fuels while imposing a cap-and-trade system to gradually reduce the economy's discharge of the greenhouse gases associated with global warming. Using 2005 as a benchmark, the bill's cap-and-trade rules would reduce these emissions by 17 percent by 2020 and 83 percent by 2050.

Under the bill, the Environmental Protection Agency would set a declining, economywide cap on the emissions of some 7,400 utilities, factories, agricultural facilities and other polluters. These regulated firms would receive permits to emit a certain quantity of greenhouse gases. Those staying below their allowance could trade the excess to firms going beyond theirs. The government would auction some allowances and give others away. The auctions would raise a projected $846 billion through 2019, most of which would be spent for purposes such as subsidizing consumer energy bills and helping firms convert from carbon-based to renewable energy sources.

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