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National votes

January 26, 2009|By Thomas Voting Reports

WASHINGTON - Here's how area members of Congress voted on major roll call votes in the week ending Jan. 23:

HOUSE



Tighter bailout rules



Voting 260 for and 166 against, the House on Jan. 21 passed a bill (HR 384) setting stricter rules for the $700 billion Troubled Assets Relief Program (TARP). The Senate will not take up the bill, relying instead on Obama administration pledges to tighten up the program. The bill pressures banks to use larger portions of their TARP money for new lending and requires some TARP outlays be used to help homeowners avoid foreclosure.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Roscoe Bartlett, R-6, no

Pennsylvania

Bill Shuster, R-9, no

West Virginia

Shelley Moore Capito, R-2, no

$700 billion bailout



Members on Jan. 22 voted, 270 for and 155 against, to block the release of the second half of the $700 billion Troubled Assets Relief Fund (TARP) that Congress and President Bush enacted last October to stabilize the U.S. economy. But this vote on HJ Res 3 was only symbolic because the Senate refused to go along.

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A yes vote backed the resolution of disapproval.

Maryland

Bartlett, yes

Pennsylvania

Shuster, yes

West Virginia

Capito, yes




SENATE



Clinton confirmation



Voting 94 for and two against, the Senate on Jan. 21 confirmed Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., as the 67th U.S. secretary of state. Sens. Jim DeMint, R-S.C., and David Vitter, R-La., cast the negative votes.

A yes vote was to confirm Clinton.

Maryland

Barbara Mikulski, D, yes

Benjamin Cardin, D, yes

Pennsylvania

Arlen Specter, R, yes

Robert Casey Jr., D, yes

West Virginia

Robert Byrd, D, yes

John Rockefeller, D, yes

Pay bias suits



Voting 61 for and 36 against, the Senate on Jan. 22 passed a bill (S 181) giving plaintiffs greater standing to file suits alleging pay discrimination. The bill would permit claims to be filed within 180 days of the latest infraction. This would nullify a 2007 Supreme Court ruling, in Ledbetter vs. Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., which requires pay bias suits to be filed within 180 days of the first infraction. This vote sent the bill back to the House for fine-tuning.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Mikulski, yes

Cardin, yes

Pennsylvania

Specter, yes

Casey, yes

West Virginia

Byrd, yes

Rockefeller, yes

GOP pay bias plan



Voting 40 for and 55 against, the Senate on Jan. 22 defeated a bid by Republicans to narrow the statute of limitations in S 181 for filing pay discrimination claims. The GOP measure sought to require claims to be filed within 180 days of the time the plaintiff first knew or should have known of the alleged discrimination. By contrast, the underlying bill would allow filings within 180 days of the latest alleged incident of paycheck bias.

A yes vote backed the amendment.

Maryland

Mikulski, no

Cardin, no

Pennsylvania

Specter, yes

Casey, no

West Virginia

Byrd, no

Rockefeller, no

Right-to-work laws



Voting 66 for and 31 against, senators on Jan. 22 tabled a proposal to add a federal right-to-work law to S 181. Twenty-two states now have right-to-work laws, which make it illegal to require union membership or the paying of union dues as a condition of employment. This amendment sought to extend right-to-work to the 28 states with union-shop rules, which allow labor agreements requiring workers to join a union or pay union dues after a minimum time on the job.

A yes vote opposed the amendment.

Maryland

Mikulski, yes

Cardin, yes

Pennsylvania

Specter, yes

Casey, yes

West Virginia

Byrd, yes

Rockefeller, yes




Key votes ahead



In the week of Jan. 26, the House will take up an $850 billion economic stimulus package, while the Senate will debate an expansion of children's health insurance and vote on Obama administration appointees.

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