Advertisement

Students rewarded with Christmas show

December 28, 2008|By JANET HEIM

HAGERSTOWN -- Good behavior has its rewards. For students at Pangborn Elementary School, the more recent reward came in the form of a theater production of "A Christmas Carol" on Monday, Dec. 15.

Kindergarten through second grade students attended the first performance, while the later program was for third to fifth graders.

Thanks to multiple costume changes, two actors from the Hampstead Stage Company in New Hampshire played all the characters for the familiar holiday tale of the miserly Mr. Scrooge and his associate Bob Cratchit. Three audience members were selected for various roles in the production.

The performance was part of the PBIS program -- Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports -- through Washington County Public Schools. Pangborn is one of six elementary schools, seven middle schools and one high school in the county that participate in the program.

Pangborn students earned the opportunity to go to the performance by not having a referral to the office since the last reward event.

Advertisement

Pangborn Assistant Principal Beth Allshouse coordinates the program, which she said has had great success. She said the program has three goals -- teaching students to be respectful, responsible and ready to learn.

"They're really cool. I especially like plays like this. I love this story," said fifth-grader Maddie Merrill of PBIS programs.

Allshouse said she tries to organize reward programs every other month and tries to choose things that students might not have been exposed to.

Fifth-grader Gregory Kiser said it was the first time he had heard of "A Christmas Carol."

"I like that we get a chance to see fun things like this," he said.

Last year the school also had a Relay for Life team and raised $7,500. This year, they've issued a challenge to other schools to join the cause.

"It's all part of the character-building part of PBIS, building students with character inside and outside of school," Allshouse said.

PBIS rewards students who are good, instead of punishing students who don't behave. Students can earn Paws Cards, based on the school's panther mascot, for good behavior.

"Everyone wants to get on board because they don't want to miss things like this," Allshouse said.

Allshouse said that since she and Principal Richard Gehrman came to Pangborn three years ago, more teachers have embraced the PBIS program, a key to its success.

Success also can be measured by numbers. Three years ago, there were 330 student referrals to the office, two years ago the number dropped to 220, last year it was 167 and this year, there are 42 for the school year.

The PBIS program "has really made a difference," Allshouse said.

She added that positive teachers who care about their students and the new building have added to the atmosphere at the school.

"This is a very positive building now. We've seen amazing changes this year," Allshouse said.

HAGERSTOWN -- Good behavior has its rewards. For students at Pangborn Elementary School, the more recent reward came in the form of a theater production of "A Christmas Carol" on Monday, Dec. 15.

Kindergarten through second grade students attended the first performance, while the later program was for third to fifth graders.

Thanks to multiple costume changes, two actors from the Hampstead Stage Company in New Hampshire played all the characters for the familiar holiday tale of the miserly Mr. Scrooge and his associate Bob Cratchit. Three audience members were selected for various roles in the production.

The performance was part of the PBIS program -- Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports -- through Washington County Public Schools. Pangborn is one of six elementary schools, seven middle schools and one high school in the county that participate in the program.

Pangborn students earned the opportunity to go to the performance by not having a referral to the office since the last reward event.

Pangborn Assistant Principal Beth Allshouse coordinates the program, which she said has had great success. She said the program has three goals -- teaching students to be respectful, responsible and ready to learn.

"They're really cool. I especially like plays like this. I love this story," said fifth-grader Maddie Merrill of PBIS programs.

Allshouse said she tries to organize reward programs every other month and tries to choose things that students might not have been exposed to.

Fifth-grader Gregory Kiser said it was the first time he had heard of "A Christmas Carol."

"I like that we get a chance to see fun things like this," he said.

Last year the school also had a Relay for Life team and raised $7,500. This year, they've issued a challenge to other schools to join the cause.

"It's all part of the character-building part of PBIS, building students with character inside and outside of school," Allshouse said.

PBIS rewards students who are good, instead of punishing students who don't behave. Students can earn Paws Cards, based on the school's panther mascot, for good behavior.

"Everyone wants to get on board because they don't want to miss things like this," Allshouse said.

Allshouse said that since she and Principal Richard Gehrman came to Pangborn three years ago, more teachers have embraced the PBIS program, a key to its success.

Success also can be measured by numbers. Three years ago, there were 330 student referrals to the office, two years ago the number dropped to 220, last year it was 167 and this year, there are 42 for the school year.

The PBIS program "has really made a difference," Allshouse said.

She added that positive teachers who care about their students and the new building have added to the atmosphere at the school.

"This is a very positive building now. We've seen amazing changes this year," Allshouse said.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|