Advertisement

Spend less, give more

December 22, 2008

PORTLAND, Ore. -- It's obvious that giving our neighbor a lame candle out of obligation for Christmas won't change the world.

But, when we spend less, give more, worship fully and love all -- Christmas can still change the world.

The Advent Conspiracy (www.AdventConspiracy.org) started as a loose network of churches determined to celebrate Christmas through relational giving -- either through service to those in need, quality time or charitable causes like contributing to drilling a well in order to provide clean drinking water.

What started as a small project has turned into a grassroots movement, with a video on YouTube that has become an internet sensation -- with more than half a million views.

This year, Advent Conspiracy has partnered with more than 1,000 churches in 17 countries and thousands of individuals participating as co-conspirators -- who are involved in projects as varied as drilling a water well for those who lack access to clean water or simply encouraging congregations to think of meaningful acts of kindness as meaningful options to replace traditional gifts.

Advertisement

Rick McKinley, a co-founder of Advent Conspiracy and the Senior Pastor of Imago Dei, said, "When we give quality time, provide clean water or just look for ways to be more loving instead of giving a gift card -- it's not just about saving money or about this economy; it's about remembering that when we give presence instead of presents, Christmas has been restored."

Last year, through Advent Conspiracy, $3 million was raised for relief projects which included providing clean water and medical attention across the globe.

This year, Advent Conspiracy anticipates that individuals and churches will match last year's commitment to charitable gifts and will make a lasting impact in communities around the world.

"We are excited that the conspiracy keeps growing and growing and that we can celebrate Christ's birth in a way that evokes worship and justice in the world."

-- Marketwire

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|