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Herald-Mail Forums

December 01, 2008

Last week's question:



As the federal government offers billions in bailout cash for large industries, small, local companies are feeling the pain of a struggling economy. What can state, local or federal governments do to help them?

o Offer them a tax break. - 17 votes (22 percent)

o Purchase more goods and services from them for government use. - 7 votes (9 percent)

o Buy a stake in those businesses. - 3 votes (4 percent)

o Give them tax credits to hire the unemployed. - 20 votes (26 percent)

o Let them alone. Nobody's helping me out. - 29 votes (38 percent)

Comments

o Posted by notlaffen, Nov. 21

Close the Funkstown bridge - that sure helped some small businesses out and maybe out of business. Revise and simplify the tax code - this is long overdue and small local companies and all citizens who pay taxes spend too much time worrying about paperwork that could better be spent drumming up new business or spending more money.

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Cut property taxes - that helps everyone. Local governments could establish a pool of able men and women who are currently unemployed and who are willing to perform manual labor and agree in advance not to sue their employees if they are injured on the job.

There is plenty of work to do around here that doesn't require a college degree. But many people are understandably reluctant to hire someone who just might be looking for an opportunity to sue for a lot more money than they could make actually working.

How about designing an affordable biomass (wood and agricultural waste) powered electric generator so the farmers and woodlot owners could clean up their properties and sell power?

o Posted by nathan21740, Nov. 24

Standing pat and doing nothing is not the answer. When businesses fail, if it were as simple as letting them fail, of course that would be the pragmatic thing to do. The problem is that as they fail, the blue-collar workers, vendors, retirees, etc. pay the ultimate price through losing homes, security, retirements, health insurance, etc. Most CEOs have the means and wherewithall to survive.

They've seen to that. Communities, schools, hospitals, emergency services, etc.,. will pay a very heavy price for the greed of some and the indifference of others.




This week's question:



On the Thankgiving holiday just past, what were you most thankful for?

o That I still have a job.

o That I and my family members have our health.

o That I didn't buy that boat, big-screen TV, RV or other purchase that I'd be having trouble paying for now.

o That I work for the government, which never goes out of business.

o Nothing. Right now, for me, life stinks.

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