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'Quarantine' didn't make me quiver with fear

Movie review: "Quarantine"

Movie review: "Quarantine"

November 11, 2008|By BRIGITTE GREWE / Pulse Correspondent

"Quarantine" promised a great horror flick, but what director John Erick Dowdle delivered was an unoriginal and unpredictable bloody mess.

Young television reporter Angela Vidal (Jennifer Carpenter) and her trusty cameraman Scott (Steve Harns) are filming a television special on local fireman in Los Angeles.

While shooting the fireman during their nightshift, the crew gets a distress call from a nearby apartment building. Angela and Scott continue to follow the fireman. Once they go on that call -- everything goes downhill from there.

Angela and the firemen find themselves greeted by a anxious resident and a concerned landlord complaining of a scream from on elderly woman on the fourth floor. The crew ends up facing a crazed old woman who is salivating foam and showing intense signs of aggression. She is found in a filthy apartment as a rabid dog escapes the room after the crew force enters her home.

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When the crew tries to help her, the old woman charges and kills one of the firemen. From that point on, they discover that the woman has passed a disease on to the remaining resident. A tenant, who is a veterinarian, explains that the disease is some sort of intensified form of rabies that's effects on humans is being sped up profusely turning everyone into carnivorous killing animals. And no one can escape for the apartment building because their building has been quarantined by the Centers of Disease Control and will not let anyone out or in and will not tell them why.

The typical plot of a disease causing everyone to become flesh eating monsters killing everyone in sight is just such a simple, overdone horror theme. Then at action scenes, which some dedicated horror/thriller watchers come specifically to see -- were all shaky and you could barely see anything. Anticipation is created throughout the movie, but it's only in bursts.

Also, the last 20 minutes of the movie aggravated me because I wanted to kill the main character by the end of the movie. For about a full 20 minutes, Angela had a constant high-pitched fast breath that got so annoying after the first five minutes.

Though "Quarantine" had its bad parts, there were a lot of good points to the movie, too. The make up and lighting were very good. The cameraman Scott kept a very steady hand, too, and watching scenes through his point of view was creative and exciting. Then at the end, when the lighting changed to night vision, you can still make out most everything in the room.

The acting was a little cheesy especially when Angela is hanging out with the fireman and puts on a fake "camera woman perkiness" throughout the whole beginning. The ending also was cliff hanging and aggravating especially because you don't know how the footage was found of the incident when there were no survivors.

"Quarantine" is a fun movie to watch with friends if you want a movie you can joke around with and laugh about. But for serious watching, scariness level out of 10, I give it a 6 1/2.

"Quarantine" is rated R.

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