Advertisement

Magazine names Waynesboro Hospital the best place to work

November 03, 2008|By KATE S. ALEXANDER

WAYNESBORO, PA. - Out of every hospital, private clinic, nursing home, insurance company and rehabilitation center in the United States, the best place to work in the field of medicine is not Johns Hopkins or the Mayo Clinic but rather the 64-bed hospital in Waynesboro, Pa., according to a national publication.

In its inaugural assessment of the nation's medical employers, Modern Healthcare Magazine said it was Waynesboro Hospital's ability to improve care and control costs while creating a focused and goal-orientated work environment that set the small hospital above the rest.

"Health-care providers are under tremendous pressure nationally to improve care and control cost," said David Burda, editor of Modern Healthcare. "Waynesboro Hospital has figured out a solution to those challenges that hospitals across the country can follow."

The magazine called Waynesboro a "modern Maybury," and the employees surveyed by Modern Healthcare during its assessment agree.

Working at Waynesboro is like working in a huge family where almost everyone takes the time to learn and remember your name, said Laboratory Assistant Melissa Updyke.

Advertisement

"Walk down the hall and at the very least, people say 'hello,'" Updyke said. "But (it) is not just 'hello,' it is 'Hi, Melissa. How's your daughter doing?'"

Since being named the nation's No. 1 place to work in health care, Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Ken Shur has been asked repeatedly what his administration does to keep employees not only happy, but productive and goal-oriented.

"We work hard to promote leaders from within," Shur said, adding that his education staff is constantly working to keep employees abreast with training and special programs.

The employees at Waynesboro Hospital were honored and overwhelmed by the award.

When Plant Operations Tradesman Jerry McAfee filled out a survey for the magazine a few months ago, he said he was honest about his supervisors, his job and how he, too, considers fellow employees family. He never thought those few answers would help establish his employer as the best in the business.

"In the great medical machine, it is incredible to think they will come down to this level and recognize us, the employees," he said. "We are honored."

The magazine considered medical employers from all corners of the profession, Shur said.

"We will continue to do what we do: relentlessly pursue excellence in care," he said.

The Herald-Mail Articles
|
|
|