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Business landscape changing in Waynesboro's west end

Laundry being razed to to make way for convenience store, but will relocate to larger building

Laundry being razed to to make way for convenience store, but will relocate to larger building

October 23, 2008|By JENNIFER FITCH

WAYNESBORO, Pa. -- Surveyors spent part of this week marking the locations of new gas tanks for the Turkey Hill Minit Market coming to the intersection of CV Avenue and Pa. 16.

The Laundry Station at the intersection since the 1960s soon will be demolished to make way for the tanks. A Turkey Hill spokeswoman previously told The Herald-Mail that 12 fueling stations are planned for the convenience store, which today is the shell of a building immediately behind the coin-operated laundry service.

Rich Gsell, who owns the laundry business, will lease from his father, Bill Gsell, a new building recently constructed farther back from the intersection. The 3,200-square-foot structure with a green roof will give Rich Gsell more than double the space he had.

"I'm looking forward to getting into a better facility for my customers," Rich Gsell said.

The new coin-operated laundry service, scheduled to open in November, will have about 30 washers and 30 dryers. All that remains for that building are electric and plumbing.

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"I'm going to have all the amenities I should've had before," Rich Gsell said. "I was limited by space."

He said Turkey Hill is aiming for a mid-January opening. Crews from Lancaster, Pa., have been working on the convenience store, although D.L. George & Sons of Waynesboro did the site work.

A Turkey Hill spokeswoman earlier said the 3,936-square-foot store probably will employ between 20 and 25 people.

Site work for the two buildings began in May. Commercial lots remain on more than four acres of the property west of the current construction.

The Borough of Waynesboro recently received permission to continue reconstruction of CV Avenue after the Oct. 15 paving deadline set by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Crews finished a base coat on the portion of the road nearest Pa. 16 and have permitted residents to use that stretch.

Federal grants have contributed to the $400,000 road project, which should wrap up in a few weeks.

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