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National votes

October 06, 2008|By Thomas Voting Reports

WASHINGTON - Here's how area members of Congress voted on major roll call votes in the week ending Oct. 3.

HOUSE



Financial bailout



Voting 263 for and 171 against, the House on Oct. 3 sent President Bush a bill (HR 1424) authorizing the Treasury to spend up to $700 billion to relieve troubled financial firms of their weakest assets while raising the limit on federal deposit insurance from $100,000 to $250,000 per depositor.

Additionally, the bill would extend soon-to-expire tax breaks for businesses, families, renewable energy and education; protect 24 million middle-income households from the creep of the Alternative Minimum Tax in 2008; increase home heating aid to the poor; and provide special aid for rural schools near large federal holdings. These and other additions are projected to cost $150 billion, $110 billion of which would be added to national debt. The bill also requires insurers to provide equality in their coverage of physical and mental illnesses in the same policy.

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A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Roscoe Bartlett, R-6, no

Pennsylvania

Bill Shuster, R-9, yes

West Virginia

Shelley Moore Capito, R-2, no

Failed rescue plan



Voting 205 for and 228 against, the House on Sept. 29 refused to authorize a five-year program in which the Treasury would spend up to $700 billion to acquire devalued assets such as mortgage-backed securities from troubled financial firms. The bill (HR 3997) contains anti-foreclosure language under which the government could force the rewriting of at least hundreds of thousands of mortgages linked to the assets it acquires. The government would have the option to receive stock in bailed-out companies, giving taxpayers a chance to benefit from any future profits.

The bailout would be run over five years by a newly created Troubled Asset Relief Program subject to court review and scrutiny by congressional and Treasury oversight agencies. Major transactions would have to be publicly reported within two days.

The bailout would be available to U.S. companies as well as foreign firms under certain circumstances, and would be funded initially at $250 billion and then in increments of $100 billion and $350 billion. Participating firms would have to scale back executive compensation defined as excessive.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Bartlett, no

Pennsylvania

Shuster, no

West Virginia

Capito, no

Indian nuclear deal



Voting 298 for and 117 against, the House on Sept. 27 approved an administration plan to sell U.S. nuclear technology, fuel and reactors to India for civilian purposes even though India, which has nuclear arms, has refused to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Bartlett, yes

Pennsylvania

Shuster, yes

West Virginia

Capito, yes




SENATE



Financial bailout



Voting 74 for and 25 against, the Senate on Oct. 1 sent the House a bill (HR 1424) under which the Treasury would spend up to $700 billion to acquire devalued assets from troubled financial firms and raise the limit on federal deposit insurance from $100,000 to $250,000 per depositor. In unrelated provisions, the bill would extend tens of billions of dollars in tax breaks for businesses, families, renewable energy and education that are due to expire at year's end and protect 22 million middle-income households from the creep of the Alternative Minimum Tax in 2008.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Barbara Mikulski, D, yes

Benjamin Cardin, D, yes

Pennsylvania

Arlen Specter, R, yes

Robert Casey Jr., D, yes

West Virginia

Robert Byrd, D, yes

John Rockefeller, D, yes

Indian nuclear deal



Voting 86 for and 13 against, the Senate on Oct. 1 sent President Bush a bill (HR 7081) authorizing the U.S. to sell civilian nuclear materials to India even though India, a nuclear state since 1974, has refused to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Mikulski, yes

Cardin, yes

Pennsylvania

Specter, yes

Casey, yes

West Virginia

Byrd, no

Rockefeller, yes

Railroad safety



Voting 74 for and 24 against, the Senate on Oct. 1 authorized the Federal Railroad Administration through 2011 at a budget of $1.2 billion and required the installation of technology by 2015 that automatically would brake trains facing collision or derailment.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

Maryland

Mikulski, yes

Cardin, yes

Pennsylvania

Specter, yes

Casey, yes

West Virginia

Byrd, yes

Rockefeller, yes




Key votes ahead



Congress is scheduled to meet next in January 2009.

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