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Washington County juvenile court briefs

June 12, 2008

If girl completes community service, case will be closed



The case of a teenage girl accused of theft from Claire's Boutique in Valley Mall was placed on the inactive docket Wednesday in juvenile court.

If the girl successfully completes 25 hours of community service within 30 days, the case will be closed, said Washington County Circuit Judge M. Kenneth Long Jr., sitting in juvenile court.

The girl must stay out of Valley Mall, the judge ordered.

Boy made to complete community service

The case of a teenage boy who received traffic citations was placed on the inactive docket Wednesday in juvenile court.

The arresting officer was not available to assist the state in its prosecution.

The boy was ordered to perform 25 hours of community service.




Teen admits to theft from home



A 16-year-old boy admitted Wednesday in juvenile court to misdemeanor theft.

Washington County Sheriff's Department deputies responding to an assault at Oak Hill House in Clear Spring on May 19 were alerted to a theft, Deputy State's Attorney Steven Kessell said. A plastic cup, Sour Patch Kids candy and a bank card were missing from an employee's vehicle, Kessell said.

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The candy and plastic cup were found in the 16-year-old's room, but the bank card was never recovered, Kessell said.

Washington County Circuit Judge M. Kenneth Long Jr., sitting in juvenile court, ordered the boy's disposition delayed. The disposition, a juvenile equivalent of sentencing, was transferred to Baltimore.

Baltimore Department of Social Services authorities had placed the boy at the Oak Hill House.




Teen admits to part in stealing iPod



A 16-year-old Hagerstown boy on Wednesday admitted his involvement in a misdemeanor theft case.

In return for the boy's admission, prosecutors dropped other charges.

On Feb. 21, the resource officer at South Hagerstown High School saw two students walking toward him, one yelling at the other, saying he had taken his iPod, Deputy State's Attorney Steven Kessell said Wednesday.

The victim had walked into the boy's restroom, and while he was in there, another boy grabbed him and held his legs while a third boy reached into the victim's pocket and took his iPod. The boy who held the victim's legs was later identified as the respondent, the juvenile equivalent of a defendant, who appeared in court Wednesday.

The stolen iPod was found in the third boy's locker.

The parents of the 16-year-old boy who admitted his involvement Wednesday have moved to a different school district so he is around new people, defense attorney Bernard W. Semler II said Wednesday.

Washington County Circuit Judge M. Kenneth Long Jr., sitting in juvenile court, ordered the boy to serve indefinite supervised probation. The boy is not allowed to have contact with the victim or the co-respondent.

On Wednesday, the youth apologized to the victim, who was in the courtroom.




Boy failed to obey police officer's order



A teenage boy on Wednesday in juvenile court was found to have failed to obey a lawful order given to him by a Hagerstown Police Department officer. The boy also had been charged with disorderly conduct but, following a brief trial, the judge dismissed that charge.

On April 25, Hagerstown Police Officer Jon Molineaux was patrolling the carnival in the area of Potomac Street and Memorial Boulevard, near Bester Elementary School.

Molineaux testified Wednesday that he saw two teenage boys start arguing. The boys looked like they were going to fight, and he told them to break it up and move along, the officer said.

Some of the carnival-goers had warned officers that the boys were fighting, Molineaux said.

The boys walked about 20 feet away, and then appeared to start arguing again, Molineaux testified.

One of the boys, identified as the boy who appeared in court Wednesday, was arrested by another officer and charged with failing to obey and disorderly conduct.

Assistant Public Defender Michael A. Wilson said the boy should be acquitted of the failure to obey charge because the officer never specified how far the boy had to move.

Washington County Circuit Judge M. Kenneth Long Jr., sitting in juvenile court, dismissed the disorderly conduct charge, but found that the boy had disobeyed an order because he only moved about 20 feet after the officer told him to leave the area, the judge said.

Long ordered the boy to serve supervised probation for an indefinite period of time and to perform 25 hours of community services before the new school year begins.

- Erin Julius

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